Determinants of attitudes and beliefs toward human papillomavirus infection, cervical cancer and human papillomavirus vaccine among parents of adolescent girls in Mysore, India

Abraham Degarege, Karl Krupp, Vijaya Srinivas, Boubakari Ibrahimou, Laura A.V. Marlow, Anjali Arun, Purnima Madhivanan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: This study examined the determinants of attitudes and beliefs about human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, cervical cancer and HPV vaccine among parents of adolescent girls in Mysore, India. Methods: A random sample of 800 parents who had at least one adolescent-aged daughter attending school were recruited for a survey. Results: Most parents (n = 778; 97.3%) completed the survey. Compared to Hindus, Muslims were more likely to perceive that their daughters are susceptible to HPV infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 4.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.87, 8.49) or cervical cancer (aOR: 2.73; 95% CI: 1.55, 4.80). However, the likelihood of perceiving that daughters are susceptible to HPV infection (aOR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.90, 0.98) or cervical cancer (aOR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.92, 0.99) decreased with an increase in the age of the parents. Perceived severity of HPV infection (aOR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.14, 0.97) and cervical cancer (aOR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.74) was lower among Muslims than Hindus. Muslims had lower odds of believing that HPV vaccine is safe (aOR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.89) or could protect against cervical cancer (aOR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.48), but were more likely to feel that HPV vaccination may cause girls to become more sexually active (aOR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.09, 3.39). The odds of believing that HPV vaccine is effective increased with an increase in the age of the parents (aOR: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.003, 1.06). Conclusion: Among Indian parents, age and religion of parents are associated with parental attitudes and beliefs about the threat of HPV and cervical cancer as well as the risks and benefits of HPV vaccine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2091-2100
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research
Volume44
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2018

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Papillomavirus Vaccines
Papillomavirus Infections
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
India
Parents
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Islam
Nuclear Family
Religion
Vaccination

Keywords

  • attitude
  • cervical cancer
  • human papillomavirus
  • vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Determinants of attitudes and beliefs toward human papillomavirus infection, cervical cancer and human papillomavirus vaccine among parents of adolescent girls in Mysore, India. / Degarege, Abraham; Krupp, Karl; Srinivas, Vijaya; Ibrahimou, Boubakari; Marlow, Laura A.V.; Arun, Anjali; Madhivanan, Purnima.

In: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research, Vol. 44, No. 11, 11.2018, p. 2091-2100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Degarege, Abraham ; Krupp, Karl ; Srinivas, Vijaya ; Ibrahimou, Boubakari ; Marlow, Laura A.V. ; Arun, Anjali ; Madhivanan, Purnima. / Determinants of attitudes and beliefs toward human papillomavirus infection, cervical cancer and human papillomavirus vaccine among parents of adolescent girls in Mysore, India. In: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research. 2018 ; Vol. 44, No. 11. pp. 2091-2100.
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abstract = "Aim: This study examined the determinants of attitudes and beliefs about human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, cervical cancer and HPV vaccine among parents of adolescent girls in Mysore, India. Methods: A random sample of 800 parents who had at least one adolescent-aged daughter attending school were recruited for a survey. Results: Most parents (n = 778; 97.3{\%}) completed the survey. Compared to Hindus, Muslims were more likely to perceive that their daughters are susceptible to HPV infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 4.94; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 2.87, 8.49) or cervical cancer (aOR: 2.73; 95{\%} CI: 1.55, 4.80). However, the likelihood of perceiving that daughters are susceptible to HPV infection (aOR: 0.94; 95{\%} CI: 0.90, 0.98) or cervical cancer (aOR: 0.95; 95{\%} CI: 0.92, 0.99) decreased with an increase in the age of the parents. Perceived severity of HPV infection (aOR: 0.36; 95{\%} CI: 0.14, 0.97) and cervical cancer (aOR: 0.33; 95{\%} CI: 0.15, 0.74) was lower among Muslims than Hindus. Muslims had lower odds of believing that HPV vaccine is safe (aOR: 0.47; 95{\%} CI: 0.25, 0.89) or could protect against cervical cancer (aOR: 0.27; 95{\%} CI: 0.16, 0.48), but were more likely to feel that HPV vaccination may cause girls to become more sexually active (aOR: 1.92; 95{\%} CI: 1.09, 3.39). The odds of believing that HPV vaccine is effective increased with an increase in the age of the parents (aOR: 1.03; 95{\%} CI: 1.003, 1.06). Conclusion: Among Indian parents, age and religion of parents are associated with parental attitudes and beliefs about the threat of HPV and cervical cancer as well as the risks and benefits of HPV vaccine.",
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T1 - Determinants of attitudes and beliefs toward human papillomavirus infection, cervical cancer and human papillomavirus vaccine among parents of adolescent girls in Mysore, India

AU - Degarege, Abraham

AU - Krupp, Karl

AU - Srinivas, Vijaya

AU - Ibrahimou, Boubakari

AU - Marlow, Laura A.V.

AU - Arun, Anjali

AU - Madhivanan, Purnima

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N2 - Aim: This study examined the determinants of attitudes and beliefs about human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, cervical cancer and HPV vaccine among parents of adolescent girls in Mysore, India. Methods: A random sample of 800 parents who had at least one adolescent-aged daughter attending school were recruited for a survey. Results: Most parents (n = 778; 97.3%) completed the survey. Compared to Hindus, Muslims were more likely to perceive that their daughters are susceptible to HPV infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 4.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.87, 8.49) or cervical cancer (aOR: 2.73; 95% CI: 1.55, 4.80). However, the likelihood of perceiving that daughters are susceptible to HPV infection (aOR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.90, 0.98) or cervical cancer (aOR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.92, 0.99) decreased with an increase in the age of the parents. Perceived severity of HPV infection (aOR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.14, 0.97) and cervical cancer (aOR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.74) was lower among Muslims than Hindus. Muslims had lower odds of believing that HPV vaccine is safe (aOR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.89) or could protect against cervical cancer (aOR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.48), but were more likely to feel that HPV vaccination may cause girls to become more sexually active (aOR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.09, 3.39). The odds of believing that HPV vaccine is effective increased with an increase in the age of the parents (aOR: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.003, 1.06). Conclusion: Among Indian parents, age and religion of parents are associated with parental attitudes and beliefs about the threat of HPV and cervical cancer as well as the risks and benefits of HPV vaccine.

AB - Aim: This study examined the determinants of attitudes and beliefs about human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, cervical cancer and HPV vaccine among parents of adolescent girls in Mysore, India. Methods: A random sample of 800 parents who had at least one adolescent-aged daughter attending school were recruited for a survey. Results: Most parents (n = 778; 97.3%) completed the survey. Compared to Hindus, Muslims were more likely to perceive that their daughters are susceptible to HPV infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 4.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.87, 8.49) or cervical cancer (aOR: 2.73; 95% CI: 1.55, 4.80). However, the likelihood of perceiving that daughters are susceptible to HPV infection (aOR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.90, 0.98) or cervical cancer (aOR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.92, 0.99) decreased with an increase in the age of the parents. Perceived severity of HPV infection (aOR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.14, 0.97) and cervical cancer (aOR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.74) was lower among Muslims than Hindus. Muslims had lower odds of believing that HPV vaccine is safe (aOR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.89) or could protect against cervical cancer (aOR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.48), but were more likely to feel that HPV vaccination may cause girls to become more sexually active (aOR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.09, 3.39). The odds of believing that HPV vaccine is effective increased with an increase in the age of the parents (aOR: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.003, 1.06). Conclusion: Among Indian parents, age and religion of parents are associated with parental attitudes and beliefs about the threat of HPV and cervical cancer as well as the risks and benefits of HPV vaccine.

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