Detection of cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens

G. L. Woods, Austin Bassett Thompson, S. L. Rennard, James Linder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To diagnose cytomegalovirus pneumonia in a heterogeneous population of patients, three methods for detection of CMV in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were compared as follow: (1) spin amplification followed by staining with a monoclonal antibody to the early nuclear antigen (EA-assay); (2) conventional tissue cell culture; and (3) cytology. Cell differentials were performed on most specimens. Cytomegalovirus was detected by one or more method in 55 BAL specimens from 39 patients. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia was diagnosed by lung tissue (primarily autopsy) histologic findings and conventional culture results or the presence of CMV in extrapulmonary tissue, fulfillment of specific clinical and radiographic criteria plus failure to recover a pathogen other than CMV from a respiratory specimen. Probable CMV pneumonia was diagnosed if only the latter two criteria were met. The EA-assay was positive in all patients with proven or probable CMV pneumonia and in 92 percent of those without documented pneumonia. Cytologic findings were positive only in patients with CMV pneumonia but were negative in one-third of those patients. As a diagnostic test for CMV pneumonia, the EA-assay, conventional culture, and cytology had positive predictive values of 45, 57, and 100 percent, respectively. Lymphocyte percentages in BAL specimens from patients with CMV pneumonia were significantly decreased compared with those of patients without CMV pneumonia (p<0.005). Although the EA-assay should not be used alone as a diagnostic test for CMV pneumonia in our patient population, the combination of alveolar lymphopenia and a positive BAL CMV EA-assay was highly suggestive of disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)568-575
Number of pages8
JournalChest
Volume98
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

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Bronchoalveolar Lavage
Cytomegalovirus
Pneumonia
Dimercaprol
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Cell Biology
Nuclear Antigens
Lymphopenia
Population
Autopsy
Cell Culture Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Detection of cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens. / Woods, G. L.; Thompson, Austin Bassett; Rennard, S. L.; Linder, James.

In: Chest, Vol. 98, No. 3, 01.01.1990, p. 568-575.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Woods, G. L. ; Thompson, Austin Bassett ; Rennard, S. L. ; Linder, James. / Detection of cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens. In: Chest. 1990 ; Vol. 98, No. 3. pp. 568-575.
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abstract = "To diagnose cytomegalovirus pneumonia in a heterogeneous population of patients, three methods for detection of CMV in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were compared as follow: (1) spin amplification followed by staining with a monoclonal antibody to the early nuclear antigen (EA-assay); (2) conventional tissue cell culture; and (3) cytology. Cell differentials were performed on most specimens. Cytomegalovirus was detected by one or more method in 55 BAL specimens from 39 patients. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia was diagnosed by lung tissue (primarily autopsy) histologic findings and conventional culture results or the presence of CMV in extrapulmonary tissue, fulfillment of specific clinical and radiographic criteria plus failure to recover a pathogen other than CMV from a respiratory specimen. Probable CMV pneumonia was diagnosed if only the latter two criteria were met. The EA-assay was positive in all patients with proven or probable CMV pneumonia and in 92 percent of those without documented pneumonia. Cytologic findings were positive only in patients with CMV pneumonia but were negative in one-third of those patients. As a diagnostic test for CMV pneumonia, the EA-assay, conventional culture, and cytology had positive predictive values of 45, 57, and 100 percent, respectively. Lymphocyte percentages in BAL specimens from patients with CMV pneumonia were significantly decreased compared with those of patients without CMV pneumonia (p<0.005). Although the EA-assay should not be used alone as a diagnostic test for CMV pneumonia in our patient population, the combination of alveolar lymphopenia and a positive BAL CMV EA-assay was highly suggestive of disease.",
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