Destruction through collaboration: How terrorists work together toward malevolent innovation

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Terrorism provides a rich yet understudied domain to examine creative teams. Because teams working in a violent ideological organization must continue to generate covert and novel ways to recruit members, raise finances, and plan attacks, theories of creativity typically applied to more conventional organizations should also apply to terrorist teams. However, with limited empirical data about this phenomenon, it is unclear which tenets of creative research hold versus which do not translate in the domain of violent extremist organizations. The present effort reviews the extant literature on malevolent creativity, as well as examines predictors of innovation in a longitudinal dataset of teams operating in 50 terrorist organizations. In addition, a case study of a historically creative team operating in the Aum Shinrikyo is examined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTeam Creativity and Innovation
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages337-362
Number of pages26
ISBN (Electronic)9780190222093
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Organizations
Creativity
Terrorism
Research
Datasets

Keywords

  • Ideology
  • Malevolent innovation
  • Recruiting
  • Teams
  • Terrorism
  • VEO
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Destruction through collaboration : How terrorists work together toward malevolent innovation. / Ligon, Gina Scott; Derrick, Douglas C.; Harms, Mackenzie.

Team Creativity and Innovation. Oxford University Press, 2017. p. 337-362.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Ligon, Gina Scott ; Derrick, Douglas C. ; Harms, Mackenzie. / Destruction through collaboration : How terrorists work together toward malevolent innovation. Team Creativity and Innovation. Oxford University Press, 2017. pp. 337-362
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