Designing Schools to Meet the Needs of Students Who Exhibit Disruptive Behavior

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article offers an evaluation of a school-wide program designed to increase the institutional capacity of elementary schools to educate students who exhibit disruptive or externalizing behavior. The project included four elements: school organizational practices, a school-wide classroom management intervention, individual behavioral programs, and an advisory board. Two elementary schools serving large numbers of disadvantaged students were studied over a period of 2 years. Comparisons with two matched elementary schools indicated strong positive effects on the disciplinary act ions of the schools and on the teachers' perceptions of their ability to work with children who exhibit disruptive behavior as well as the extent of shared goals among staff for working with disruptive behavior. Additionally, comparisons between target students (i.e., those who exhibited disruptive behavior), and criterion students indicated positive effects on the social adjustment, academic performance, and school survival skills of target students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-161
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Fingerprint

Students
elementary school
school
student
social adjustment
Social Adjustment
Aptitude
Vulnerable Populations
Problem Behavior
staff
classroom
ability
teacher
Ions
evaluation
management
performance
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Designing Schools to Meet the Needs of Students Who Exhibit Disruptive Behavior. / Nelson, J. Ron.

In: Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.01.1996, p. 147-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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