Depth-dependent hydraulic conductivity distribution patterns of a streambed

Xun-Hong Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Characterization of streambed hydraulic conductivity from the channel surface to a great depth below the channel surface can provide needed information for the determination of stream-aquifer hydrologic connectedness, and it is also important to river restoration. However, knowledge on the streambed hydraulic conductivity for sediments 1 m below the channel surface is scarce. This study describes a method that was used to determine the distribution patterns of streambed hydraulic conductivity for sediments from channel surface to a depth of 15 m below. The method includes Geoprobe's direct-push techniques and Permeameter tests. Direct-push techniques were used to generate the electrical conductivity (EC) logs and to collect sequences of continuous sediment cores from river channels, as well as from the alluvial aquifer connected to the river. Permeameter tests on these sediment cores give the profiles of vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) of the channel sediments and the aquifer materials. This method was applied to produce Kv profiles for a streambed and an alluvial aquifer in the Platte River Valley of Nebraska, USA. Comparison and statistical analysis of the Kv profiles from the river channel and from the proximate alluvial aquifer indicates a special pattern of Kv in the channel sediments. This depth-dependent pattern of Kv distribution for the channel sediments is considered to be produced by hyporheic processes. This Kv-distribution pattern implied that the effect of hyporheic processes on streambed hydraulic conductivity can reach the sediments about 9 m below the channel surface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)278-287
Number of pages10
JournalHydrological Processes
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2011

Fingerprint

hydraulic conductivity
aquifer
sediment
permeameter
river channel
sediment core
river
distribution
electrical conductivity
statistical analysis
valley
method

Keywords

  • Direct-push technique
  • Platte River
  • Streambed
  • Vertical hydraulic conductivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Depth-dependent hydraulic conductivity distribution patterns of a streambed. / Chen, Xun-Hong.

In: Hydrological Processes, Vol. 25, No. 2, 15.01.2011, p. 278-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{89b8e1d1cb014dee8591facfe88f8792,
title = "Depth-dependent hydraulic conductivity distribution patterns of a streambed",
abstract = "Characterization of streambed hydraulic conductivity from the channel surface to a great depth below the channel surface can provide needed information for the determination of stream-aquifer hydrologic connectedness, and it is also important to river restoration. However, knowledge on the streambed hydraulic conductivity for sediments 1 m below the channel surface is scarce. This study describes a method that was used to determine the distribution patterns of streambed hydraulic conductivity for sediments from channel surface to a depth of 15 m below. The method includes Geoprobe's direct-push techniques and Permeameter tests. Direct-push techniques were used to generate the electrical conductivity (EC) logs and to collect sequences of continuous sediment cores from river channels, as well as from the alluvial aquifer connected to the river. Permeameter tests on these sediment cores give the profiles of vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) of the channel sediments and the aquifer materials. This method was applied to produce Kv profiles for a streambed and an alluvial aquifer in the Platte River Valley of Nebraska, USA. Comparison and statistical analysis of the Kv profiles from the river channel and from the proximate alluvial aquifer indicates a special pattern of Kv in the channel sediments. This depth-dependent pattern of Kv distribution for the channel sediments is considered to be produced by hyporheic processes. This Kv-distribution pattern implied that the effect of hyporheic processes on streambed hydraulic conductivity can reach the sediments about 9 m below the channel surface.",
keywords = "Direct-push technique, Platte River, Streambed, Vertical hydraulic conductivity",
author = "Xun-Hong Chen",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1002/hyp.7844",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "278--287",
journal = "Hydrological Processes",
issn = "0885-6087",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Depth-dependent hydraulic conductivity distribution patterns of a streambed

AU - Chen, Xun-Hong

PY - 2011/1/15

Y1 - 2011/1/15

N2 - Characterization of streambed hydraulic conductivity from the channel surface to a great depth below the channel surface can provide needed information for the determination of stream-aquifer hydrologic connectedness, and it is also important to river restoration. However, knowledge on the streambed hydraulic conductivity for sediments 1 m below the channel surface is scarce. This study describes a method that was used to determine the distribution patterns of streambed hydraulic conductivity for sediments from channel surface to a depth of 15 m below. The method includes Geoprobe's direct-push techniques and Permeameter tests. Direct-push techniques were used to generate the electrical conductivity (EC) logs and to collect sequences of continuous sediment cores from river channels, as well as from the alluvial aquifer connected to the river. Permeameter tests on these sediment cores give the profiles of vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) of the channel sediments and the aquifer materials. This method was applied to produce Kv profiles for a streambed and an alluvial aquifer in the Platte River Valley of Nebraska, USA. Comparison and statistical analysis of the Kv profiles from the river channel and from the proximate alluvial aquifer indicates a special pattern of Kv in the channel sediments. This depth-dependent pattern of Kv distribution for the channel sediments is considered to be produced by hyporheic processes. This Kv-distribution pattern implied that the effect of hyporheic processes on streambed hydraulic conductivity can reach the sediments about 9 m below the channel surface.

AB - Characterization of streambed hydraulic conductivity from the channel surface to a great depth below the channel surface can provide needed information for the determination of stream-aquifer hydrologic connectedness, and it is also important to river restoration. However, knowledge on the streambed hydraulic conductivity for sediments 1 m below the channel surface is scarce. This study describes a method that was used to determine the distribution patterns of streambed hydraulic conductivity for sediments from channel surface to a depth of 15 m below. The method includes Geoprobe's direct-push techniques and Permeameter tests. Direct-push techniques were used to generate the electrical conductivity (EC) logs and to collect sequences of continuous sediment cores from river channels, as well as from the alluvial aquifer connected to the river. Permeameter tests on these sediment cores give the profiles of vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) of the channel sediments and the aquifer materials. This method was applied to produce Kv profiles for a streambed and an alluvial aquifer in the Platte River Valley of Nebraska, USA. Comparison and statistical analysis of the Kv profiles from the river channel and from the proximate alluvial aquifer indicates a special pattern of Kv in the channel sediments. This depth-dependent pattern of Kv distribution for the channel sediments is considered to be produced by hyporheic processes. This Kv-distribution pattern implied that the effect of hyporheic processes on streambed hydraulic conductivity can reach the sediments about 9 m below the channel surface.

KW - Direct-push technique

KW - Platte River

KW - Streambed

KW - Vertical hydraulic conductivity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78650944295&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78650944295&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/hyp.7844

DO - 10.1002/hyp.7844

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 278

EP - 287

JO - Hydrological Processes

JF - Hydrological Processes

SN - 0885-6087

IS - 2

ER -