Depression treatment for impoverished mothers by point-of-care providers

A randomized controlled trial

Lisa S. Segre, Rebecca L Brock, Michael W. O'Hara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Depression in low-income, ethnic-minority women of childbearing age is prevalent and compromises infant and child development. Yet numerous barriers prevent treatment delivery. Listening Visits (LV), an empirically supported intervention developed for delivery by British home-visiting nurses, could address this unmet mental health need. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluated the effectiveness of LV delivered at a woman's usual point-of-care, including home visits or an ob-gyn office. Method: Listening Visits were delivered to depressed pregnant women or mothers of young children by their point-of-care provider (e.g., home visitor or physician's assistant), all of whom had low levels of prior counseling experience. Three quarters of the study's participants were low-income. Of those who reported ethnicity, all identified themselves as minorities. Participants from 4 study sites (N = 66) were randomized in a 2:1 ratio, to LV or a wait-list control group (WLC). Assessments, conducted at baseline and 8 weeks, evaluated depression, quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Results: Depressive severity, depressive symptoms, and quality of life significantly improved among LV recipients as compared with women receiving standard social/health services. Women valued LV as evidenced by their high attendance rates and treatment satisfaction ratings. Conclusions: In a stepped model of depression care, LV can provide an accessible, acceptable, and effective first-line treatment option for at-risk women who otherwise are unlikely to receive treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-324
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume83
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Point-of-Care Systems
Randomized Controlled Trials
Mothers
Depression
Community Health Nurses
Child Development
Quality of Life
Therapeutics
Physician Assistants
House Calls
Social Work
Health Services
Counseling
Pregnant Women
Mental Health
Randomized Controlled Trial
Control Groups

Keywords

  • depression treatment
  • home visitors
  • Listening Visits
  • low-income ethnic-minority mothers
  • point-of-care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Depression treatment for impoverished mothers by point-of-care providers : A randomized controlled trial. / Segre, Lisa S.; Brock, Rebecca L; O'Hara, Michael W.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 83, No. 2, 01.04.2015, p. 314-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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