Deploying temporary networks for upscaling of sparse network stations

Evan J. Coopersmith, Michael H. Cosh, Jesse E. Bell, Victoria Kelly, Mark Hall, Michael A. Palecki, Marouane Temimi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Soil observations networks at the national scale play an integral role in hydrologic modeling, drought assessment, agricultural decision support, and our ability to understand climate change. Understanding soil moisture variability is necessary to apply these measurements to model calibration, business and consumer applications, or even human health issues. The installation of soil moisture sensors as sparse, national networks is necessitated by limited financial resources. However, this results in the incomplete sampling of the local heterogeneity of soil type, vegetation cover, topography, and the fine spatial distribution of precipitation events. To this end, temporary networks can be installed in the areas surrounding a permanent installation within a sparse network. The temporary networks deployed in this study provide a more representative average at the 3 km and 9 km scales, localized about the permanent gauge. The value of such temporary networks is demonstrated at test sites in Millbrook, New York and Crossville, Tennessee. The capacity of a single U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) sensor set to approximate the average of a temporary network at the 3 km and 9 km scales using a simple linear scaling function is tested. The capacity of a temporary network to provide reliable estimates with diminishing numbers of sensors, the temporal stability of those networks, and ultimately, the relationship of the variability of those networks to soil moisture conditions at the permanent sensor are investigated. In this manner, this work demonstrates the single-season installation of a temporary network as a mechanism to characterize the soil moisture variability at a permanent gauge within a sparse network.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-444
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation
Volume52
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

upscaling
Soil moisture
soil moisture
sensor
Gages
gauge
Sensors
Soils
Drought
Climate change
Topography
Spatial distribution
vegetation cover
Sensor networks
soil type
drought
Health
topography
Calibration
spatial distribution

Keywords

  • Data mining
  • In-situ observation
  • Soil moisture
  • Temporary networks
  • Upscaling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Computers in Earth Sciences
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Deploying temporary networks for upscaling of sparse network stations. / Coopersmith, Evan J.; Cosh, Michael H.; Bell, Jesse E.; Kelly, Victoria; Hall, Mark; Palecki, Michael A.; Temimi, Marouane.

In: International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, Vol. 52, 01.10.2016, p. 433-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coopersmith, Evan J. ; Cosh, Michael H. ; Bell, Jesse E. ; Kelly, Victoria ; Hall, Mark ; Palecki, Michael A. ; Temimi, Marouane. / Deploying temporary networks for upscaling of sparse network stations. In: International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation. 2016 ; Vol. 52. pp. 433-444.
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