Defining child noncompliance: An examination of temporal parameters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined compliance parameters for 53 clinic-referred and nonreferred children, ages 2 to 10 years. Although there were significant differences between the referred and nonreferred samples for percentage compliance, there were no significant differences between the referred and nonreferred samples in terms of initiation or completion latencies. The average initiation latency was 5.92 s, whereas 98% of the sample initiated compliance within 14 s. Younger children did take longer to complete tasks. Results suggest that the use of short latencies in defining noncompliance may represent overly conservative criteria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-176
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of applied behavior analysis
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Compliance
examination
Latency
Clinic
Completion

Keywords

  • Compliance
  • Initiation latency
  • Noncompliance
  • Parent training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Defining child noncompliance : An examination of temporal parameters. / Shriver, Mark D; Allen, Keith D.

In: Journal of applied behavior analysis, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.01.1997, p. 173-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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