Defence-related priming and responses to recurring drought: Two manifestations of plant transcriptional memory mediated by the ABA and JA signalling pathways

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Collective evidence from agricultural practices and from scientific research has demonstrated that plants can alter their phenotypic responses to repeated biotic and abiotic stresses or their elicitors. A coordinated reaction at the organismal, cellular, and genome levels has suggested that plants can “remember” an earlier stress and modify their future responses, accordingly. Stress memory may increase a plant's survival chances by improving its tolerance/avoidance abilities and may provide a mechanism for acclimation and adaptation. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate plant stress memory is not only an intellectually challenging topic but has important implications for agricultural practices as well. Here, I focus exclusively on specific aspects of the transcription memory in response to recurring dehydration stresses and the memory-type responses to insect damage in a process known as “priming.” The questions discussed are (a) whether/how the two memory phenomena are connected at the level of transcriptional regulation; (b) how differential transcription is achieved mechanistically under a repeated stress; and (c) whether similar molecular and/or epigenetic mechanisms are involved. Possible biological relevance of transcriptional stress memory and its preservation in plant evolution are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)983-997
Number of pages15
JournalPlant Cell and Environment
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

Fingerprint

Droughts
abscisic acid
drought
transcription (genetics)
dehydration (animal physiology)
Aptitude
Acclimatization
plant stress
biotic stress
Dehydration
Epigenomics
epigenetics
abiotic stress
Insects
acclimation
Genome
insects
genome
Research

Keywords

  • dehydration stress
  • herbivory
  • hormones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

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title = "Defence-related priming and responses to recurring drought: Two manifestations of plant transcriptional memory mediated by the ABA and JA signalling pathways",
abstract = "Collective evidence from agricultural practices and from scientific research has demonstrated that plants can alter their phenotypic responses to repeated biotic and abiotic stresses or their elicitors. A coordinated reaction at the organismal, cellular, and genome levels has suggested that plants can “remember” an earlier stress and modify their future responses, accordingly. Stress memory may increase a plant's survival chances by improving its tolerance/avoidance abilities and may provide a mechanism for acclimation and adaptation. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate plant stress memory is not only an intellectually challenging topic but has important implications for agricultural practices as well. Here, I focus exclusively on specific aspects of the transcription memory in response to recurring dehydration stresses and the memory-type responses to insect damage in a process known as “priming.” The questions discussed are (a) whether/how the two memory phenomena are connected at the level of transcriptional regulation; (b) how differential transcription is achieved mechanistically under a repeated stress; and (c) whether similar molecular and/or epigenetic mechanisms are involved. Possible biological relevance of transcriptional stress memory and its preservation in plant evolution are also discussed.",
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N2 - Collective evidence from agricultural practices and from scientific research has demonstrated that plants can alter their phenotypic responses to repeated biotic and abiotic stresses or their elicitors. A coordinated reaction at the organismal, cellular, and genome levels has suggested that plants can “remember” an earlier stress and modify their future responses, accordingly. Stress memory may increase a plant's survival chances by improving its tolerance/avoidance abilities and may provide a mechanism for acclimation and adaptation. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate plant stress memory is not only an intellectually challenging topic but has important implications for agricultural practices as well. Here, I focus exclusively on specific aspects of the transcription memory in response to recurring dehydration stresses and the memory-type responses to insect damage in a process known as “priming.” The questions discussed are (a) whether/how the two memory phenomena are connected at the level of transcriptional regulation; (b) how differential transcription is achieved mechanistically under a repeated stress; and (c) whether similar molecular and/or epigenetic mechanisms are involved. Possible biological relevance of transcriptional stress memory and its preservation in plant evolution are also discussed.

AB - Collective evidence from agricultural practices and from scientific research has demonstrated that plants can alter their phenotypic responses to repeated biotic and abiotic stresses or their elicitors. A coordinated reaction at the organismal, cellular, and genome levels has suggested that plants can “remember” an earlier stress and modify their future responses, accordingly. Stress memory may increase a plant's survival chances by improving its tolerance/avoidance abilities and may provide a mechanism for acclimation and adaptation. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate plant stress memory is not only an intellectually challenging topic but has important implications for agricultural practices as well. Here, I focus exclusively on specific aspects of the transcription memory in response to recurring dehydration stresses and the memory-type responses to insect damage in a process known as “priming.” The questions discussed are (a) whether/how the two memory phenomena are connected at the level of transcriptional regulation; (b) how differential transcription is achieved mechanistically under a repeated stress; and (c) whether similar molecular and/or epigenetic mechanisms are involved. Possible biological relevance of transcriptional stress memory and its preservation in plant evolution are also discussed.

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