Decision making processes and alcohol use among college students

Jennifer M. Wolff, Lisa J. Crockett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The neurobiological model of risk-taking and the dual-process model of decision making each provide possible explanations of risky behavior among youth, but their interconnections have rarely been explored, especially among college students, a time of increased alcohol use. Participants:n = 382; Mage = 19.25, SD = 1.33. Method: Participants completed a survey about their deliberative and intuitive decision making style (based on the dual-process model), their socioemotional and cognitive control processes (based on the neurobiological model), and alcohol use. Results: Structural equation modeling showed that dual-process variables and neurobiological variables were positively related. Deliberative decision making and cognitive control were negatively related to alcohol use whereas intuitive decision making was not. Comment: Discussion focuses on the integration of theoretical models with real-world health behaviors and considers implications of the current findings in terms of prevention and intervention to reduce drinking among college students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)627-637
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume67
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2019

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Decision Making
Alcohols
Students
Health Behavior
Risk-Taking
Theoretical Models

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • decision making
  • neurobiological model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Decision making processes and alcohol use among college students. / Wolff, Jennifer M.; Crockett, Lisa J.

In: Journal of American College Health, Vol. 67, No. 7, 03.10.2019, p. 627-637.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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