Daily dietary intake patterns improve after visiting a food pantry among food-insecure rural midwestern adults

Breanne N. Wright, Regan L. Bailey, Bruce A. Craig, Richard D. Mattes, Lacey McCormack, Suzanne Stluka, Lisa Franzen-Castle, Becky Henne, Donna Mehrle, Dan Remley, Heather A. Eicher-Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Emergency food pantries provide food at no cost to low-resource populations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate single-day dietary intake patterns before and after visiting a food pantry among food-secure and food-insecure pantry clients. This observational cohort study comprised a paired, before-and-after design with a pantry visit as the intervention. Participants (n = 455) completed a demographic and food security assessment, and two 24-h dietary recalls. Adult food security was measured using the U.S. Household Food Security Survey Module. Dietary intake patterns were assessed using Automated Self-Administered 24-h Recall data and classified by Healthy Eating Index (HEI-2010) scores, dietary variety, number of eating occasions, and energy intake. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared outcomes before and after a pantry visit. Mean dietary variety increased after the pantry visit among both food-secure (p = 0.02) and food-insecure (p < 0.0001) pantry clients. Mean energy intake (p = 0.0003), number of eating occasions (p = 0.004), and HEI-2010 component scores for total fruit (p < 0.001) and whole fruit (p < 0.0003) increased among food-insecure pantry clients only. A pantry visit may improve dietary intake patterns, especially among food-insecure pantry clients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number583
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 9 2018

Fingerprint

food pantries
food intake
Food
food security
Food Supply
energy intake
ingestion
fruits
diet recall
healthy diet
Energy Intake
cohort studies
Fruit
Eating
households
demographic statistics
Nonparametric Statistics
Observational Studies
Emergencies
Cohort Studies

Keywords

  • Dietary patterns
  • Dietary quality
  • Emergency food assistance
  • Food insecurity
  • Food pantry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Wright, B. N., Bailey, R. L., Craig, B. A., Mattes, R. D., McCormack, L., Stluka, S., ... Eicher-Miller, H. A. (2018). Daily dietary intake patterns improve after visiting a food pantry among food-insecure rural midwestern adults. Nutrients, 10(5), [583]. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050583

Daily dietary intake patterns improve after visiting a food pantry among food-insecure rural midwestern adults. / Wright, Breanne N.; Bailey, Regan L.; Craig, Bruce A.; Mattes, Richard D.; McCormack, Lacey; Stluka, Suzanne; Franzen-Castle, Lisa; Henne, Becky; Mehrle, Donna; Remley, Dan; Eicher-Miller, Heather A.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 10, No. 5, 583, 09.05.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wright, BN, Bailey, RL, Craig, BA, Mattes, RD, McCormack, L, Stluka, S, Franzen-Castle, L, Henne, B, Mehrle, D, Remley, D & Eicher-Miller, HA 2018, 'Daily dietary intake patterns improve after visiting a food pantry among food-insecure rural midwestern adults', Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 5, 583. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050583
Wright, Breanne N. ; Bailey, Regan L. ; Craig, Bruce A. ; Mattes, Richard D. ; McCormack, Lacey ; Stluka, Suzanne ; Franzen-Castle, Lisa ; Henne, Becky ; Mehrle, Donna ; Remley, Dan ; Eicher-Miller, Heather A. / Daily dietary intake patterns improve after visiting a food pantry among food-insecure rural midwestern adults. In: Nutrients. 2018 ; Vol. 10, No. 5.
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