Customizing microarrays for neuroscience drug discovery

Matthew J. Girgenti, Samuel Sathyanesan Newton

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Microarray-based gene profiling has become the centerpiece of gene expression studies in the biological sciences. The ability to now interrogate the entire genome using a single chip demonstrates the progress in technology and instrumentation that has been made over the last two decades. Although this unbiased approach provides researchers with an immense quantity of data, obtaining meaningful insight is not possible without intensive data analysis and processing. Custom developed arrays have emerged as a viable and attractive alternative that can take advantage of this robust technology and tailor it to suit the needs and requirements of individual investigations. The ability to simplify data analysis, reduce noise and carefully optimize experimental conditions makes it a suitable tool that can be effectively utilized in neuroscience drug discovery efforts. Furthermore, incorporating recent advancements in fine focusing gene profiling to include specific cellular phenotypes can help resolve the complex cellular heterogeneity of the brain. This review surveys the use of microarray technology in neuroscience paying special attention to customized arrays and their potential in drug discovery. Novel applications of microarrays and ancillary techniques, such as laser microdissection, FAC sorting and RNA amplification, have also been discussed. The notion that a hypothesis-driven approach can be integrated into drug development programs is highlighted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1139-1149
Number of pages11
JournalExpert Opinion on Drug Discovery
Volume2
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2007

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Keywords

  • Customarray
  • Drug development
  • G-protein-coupled receptor
  • Gene expression
  • Laser microdissection
  • Neuroarray
  • Neuropsychiatry
  • RNA amplification
  • chIP-chip

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Drug Discovery

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