Curcumin enhances human macrophage control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

Xiyuan Bai, Rebecca E Deegan, An Bai, Alida R. Ovrutsky, William H. Kinney, Michael Weaver, Gong Zhang, Jennifer R. Honda, Edward D. Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objective: With the worldwide emergence of highly drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), novel agents that have direct antimycobacterial effects or that enhance host immunity are urgently needed. Curcumin is a polyphenol responsible for the bright yellow-orange colour of turmeric, a spice derived from the root of the perennial herb Curcuma longa. Curcumin is a potent inducer of apoptosis—an effector mechanism used by macrophages to kill intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). Methods: An in vitro human macrophage infection model was used to determine the effects of curcumin on MTB survival. Results: We found that curcumin enhanced the clearance of MTB in differentiated THP-1 human monocytes and in primary human alveolar macrophages. We also found that curcumin was an inducer of caspase-3-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. Curcumin mediated these anti-MTB cellular functions, in part, via inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) activation. Conclusion: Curcumin protects against MTB infection in human macrophages. The host-protective role of curcumin against MTB in macrophages needs confirmation in an animal model; if validated, the immunomodulatory anti-TB effects of curcumin would be less prone to drug resistance development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)951-957
Number of pages7
JournalRespirology
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Mycobacterium Infections
Curcumin
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Macrophages
Curcuma
Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis
Spices
NF-kappa B
Autophagy
Alveolar Macrophages
Polyphenols
Drug Resistance
Caspase 3
Monocytes
Immunity
Tuberculosis
Animal Models
Color
Apoptosis
Survival

Keywords

  • apoptosis
  • autophagy
  • curcumin
  • nuclear-factor kappa B
  • tuberculosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Bai, X., Deegan, R. E., Bai, A., Ovrutsky, A. R., Kinney, W. H., Weaver, M., ... Chan, E. D. (2016). Curcumin enhances human macrophage control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Respirology, 21(5), 951-957. https://doi.org/10.1111/resp.12762

Curcumin enhances human macrophage control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. / Bai, Xiyuan; Deegan, Rebecca E; Bai, An; Ovrutsky, Alida R.; Kinney, William H.; Weaver, Michael; Zhang, Gong; Honda, Jennifer R.; Chan, Edward D.

In: Respirology, Vol. 21, No. 5, 01.07.2016, p. 951-957.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bai, X, Deegan, RE, Bai, A, Ovrutsky, AR, Kinney, WH, Weaver, M, Zhang, G, Honda, JR & Chan, ED 2016, 'Curcumin enhances human macrophage control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection', Respirology, vol. 21, no. 5, pp. 951-957. https://doi.org/10.1111/resp.12762
Bai, Xiyuan ; Deegan, Rebecca E ; Bai, An ; Ovrutsky, Alida R. ; Kinney, William H. ; Weaver, Michael ; Zhang, Gong ; Honda, Jennifer R. ; Chan, Edward D. / Curcumin enhances human macrophage control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In: Respirology. 2016 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 951-957.
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