Critical issues in food allergy: A national academies consensus report

Scott H. Sicherer, Katrina Allen, Gideon Lack, Steve L. Taylor, Sharon M. Donovan, Maria Oria

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened an expert, ad hoc committee to examine critical issues related to food allergy. The authors of the resulting report, "Finding a Path to Safety in Food Allergy: Assessment of the Global Burden, Causes, Prevention, Management, and Public Policy, " evaluated the scientific evidence on the prevalence, diagnosis, prevention, and management of food allergy and made recommendations to bring about a safe environment for those affected. The committee recommended approaches to monitor prevalence, explore risk factors, improve diagnosis, and provide evidence-based health care. Regarding diagnostics, emphasis was placed on utilizing allergy tests judiciously in the context of the medical history because positive test results are not, in isolation, diagnostic. Evidence-based prevention strategies were advised (for example, a strategy to prevent peanut allergy through early dietary introduction). The report encourages improved education of stakeholders for recognizing and managing as well as preventing allergic reactions, including an emphasis on using intramuscular epinephrine promptly to treat anaphylaxis. The report recommends improved food allergen labeling and evaluation of the need for epinephrine autoinjectors with a dosage appropriate for infants. The committee recommended policies and guidelines to prevent and treat food allergic reactions in a various settings and suggested research priorities to address key questions about diagnostics, mechanisms, risk determinants, and management. Identifying safe and effective therapies is the ultimate goal. This article summarizes the key findings from the report and emphasizes recommendations for actions that are applicable to pediatricians and to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere20170194
JournalPediatrics
Volume140
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2017

Fingerprint

Food Hypersensitivity
Hypersensitivity
Epinephrine
Peanut Hypersensitivity
Food Labeling
Evidence-Based Practice
Risk Management
Anaphylaxis
Public Policy
Allergens
Medicine
Guidelines
Pediatrics
Safety
Education
Food
Research
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Sicherer, S. H., Allen, K., Lack, G., Taylor, S. L., Donovan, S. M., & Oria, M. (2017). Critical issues in food allergy: A national academies consensus report. Pediatrics, 140(2), [e20170194]. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-0194

Critical issues in food allergy : A national academies consensus report. / Sicherer, Scott H.; Allen, Katrina; Lack, Gideon; Taylor, Steve L.; Donovan, Sharon M.; Oria, Maria.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 140, No. 2, e20170194, 08.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sicherer, SH, Allen, K, Lack, G, Taylor, SL, Donovan, SM & Oria, M 2017, 'Critical issues in food allergy: A national academies consensus report', Pediatrics, vol. 140, no. 2, e20170194. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-0194
Sicherer, Scott H. ; Allen, Katrina ; Lack, Gideon ; Taylor, Steve L. ; Donovan, Sharon M. ; Oria, Maria. / Critical issues in food allergy : A national academies consensus report. In: Pediatrics. 2017 ; Vol. 140, No. 2.
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