Coronary hemodynamics and atherosclerotic wall stiffness: A vicious cycle

Yiannis S. Chatzizisis, George D. Giannoglou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Local hemodynamic environment, including low shear stress and increased tensile stress, determines the localization, growth and progression of coronary atherosclerosis. As atherosclerotic lesions evolve, the diseased coronary arteries undergo local quantitative and qualitative changes in their wall, and progressively become stiff. Arterial stiffening amplifies the atherogenic local hemodynamic environment, initiating a self-perpetuating vicious cycle, which drives the progression of atherosclerosis and the formation of atherosclerotic plaque. In vivo evidence indicates that endothelial dysfunction is associated with arterial stiffness, an association that creates a challenging perspective of utilizing stiffness as an early marker of endothelial dysfunction and future atherosclerosis. Coronary stiffening is also associated with vascular remodeling, which is a major determinant of the natural history of atherosclerotic plaques. Thus, arterial stiffness may constitute a useful marker for the identification of the remodeling pattern, in particular expansive remodeling, which is closely associated with high-risk plaques. The early identification of endothelial dysfunction, or a high-risk plaque may enable the early adoption of preventive measures to improve endothelial function, or justify pre-emptive local interventions in high-risk regions to prevent future acute coronary syndromes. Further experimental and perspective clinical studies are needed for the investigation of these perspectives, whereas the development of new modalities for non-invasive and reliable assessment of coronary stiffness is anticipated to serve these studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-355
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Hypotheses
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 31 2007

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Vascular Stiffness
Hemodynamics
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Coronary Artery Disease
Atherosclerosis
Acute Coronary Syndrome
Growth
Vascular Remodeling
Clinical Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Coronary hemodynamics and atherosclerotic wall stiffness : A vicious cycle. / Chatzizisis, Yiannis S.; Giannoglou, George D.

In: Medical Hypotheses, Vol. 69, No. 2, 31.05.2007, p. 349-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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