Continuous glucose monitoring: A review of the technology and clinical use

David C. Klonoff, David Ahn, Andjela T Drincic

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is an increasingly adopted technology for insulin-requiring patients that provides insights into glycemic fluctuations. CGM can assist patients in managing their diabetes with lifestyle and medication adjustments. This article provides an overview of the technical and clinical features of CGM based on a review of articles in PubMed on CGM from 1999 through January 31, 2017. A detailed description is presented of three professional (retrospective), three personal (real-time) continuous glucose monitors, and three sensor integrated pumps (consisting of a sensor and pump that communicate with each other to determine an optimal insulin dose and adjust the delivery of insulin) that are currently available in United States. We have reviewed outpatient CGM outcomes, focusing on hemoglobin A1c (A1C), hypoglycemia, and quality of life. Issues affecting accuracy, detection of glycemic variability, strategies for optimal use, as well as cybersecurity and future directions for sensor design and use are discussed. In conclusion, CGM is an important tool for monitoring diabetes that has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Given currently available data and technological developments, we believe that with appropriate patient education, CGM can also be considered for other patient populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)178-192
Number of pages15
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume133
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017

Fingerprint

Technology
Glucose
Insulin
Computer Security
Social Adjustment
Patient Education
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Hypoglycemia
PubMed
Life Style
Hemoglobins
Outpatients
Quality of Life
Population

Keywords

  • CGM
  • Continuous glucose monitor
  • Continuous glucose monitoring
  • Personal
  • Professional
  • Sensor integrated insulin pump

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Continuous glucose monitoring : A review of the technology and clinical use. / Klonoff, David C.; Ahn, David; Drincic, Andjela T.

In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 133, 11.2017, p. 178-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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