Consumer sensory acceptance and value of domestic, Canadian, and Australian grass-fed beef steaks

B. M. Sitz, C. R. Calkins, D. M. Feuz, W. J. Umberger, Kent M Eskridge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine US consumer acceptance and value of beef from various countries, 24 taste panels of consumers (n = 273 consumers) were conducted in Denver and Chicago. Two pairs of strip steaks were evaluated for flavor, juiciness, tenderness, and overall acceptability on eight-point hedonic scales. One pair consisted of an Australian grass-fed strip steak and a domestic strip steak, whereas the other pair included Canadian and domestic strip steaks. The pairs were matched to similar Warner-Bratzler shear values and marbling scores to decrease variation associated with tenderness and juiciness. A variation of the Vickery auction was used to obtain silent, sealed bids on steaks (0.45 kg) from the same strip loins sampled in the taste panel. Consumers gave higher (P < 0.001) scores for flavor, juiciness, tenderness, and overall acceptability for domestic steaks compared with Australian grass-fed steaks. Domestic steaks averaged $3.68/0.45 kg, whereas consumers placed an average value of $2.48/0.45 kg on Australian grass-fed steaks (P < 0.001). Consumers rated Canadian steaks numerically lower for juiciness (P = 0.09) and lower (P < 0.005) for flavor, tenderness, and overall acceptability than domestic samples. Consumers placed an average value of $3.95/0.45 kg for domestic steaks and $3.57/0.45 kg for Canadian steaks (P < 0.01). Consumers (19.0%) who preferred Australian grass-fed steaks over domestic steaks paid $1.38/0.45 kg more (P < 0.001), whereas consumers (29.3%) who favored the Canadian steaks over the domestic steaks paid $1.37/0.45 kg more (P < 0.001) for the Canadian steaks. A majority of US consumers seem to be accustomed to the taste of domestic beef and prefer domestic steaks to beef from Australia grass-fed and Canadian beef.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2863-2868
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume83
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

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steaks
Poaceae
beef
grasses
juiciness
Pleasure
Red Meat
flavor
sensory evaluation
loins (meat cut)
auctions
consumer acceptance
marbling

Keywords

  • Beef
  • Country of Origin
  • Grain-Fed
  • Grass-Fed
  • Palatability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Consumer sensory acceptance and value of domestic, Canadian, and Australian grass-fed beef steaks. / Sitz, B. M.; Calkins, C. R.; Feuz, D. M.; Umberger, W. J.; Eskridge, Kent M.

In: Journal of animal science, Vol. 83, No. 12, 01.12.2005, p. 2863-2868.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sitz, B. M. ; Calkins, C. R. ; Feuz, D. M. ; Umberger, W. J. ; Eskridge, Kent M. / Consumer sensory acceptance and value of domestic, Canadian, and Australian grass-fed beef steaks. In: Journal of animal science. 2005 ; Vol. 83, No. 12. pp. 2863-2868.
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