Congruence between Objective and Self-Report Data in a Sample of Young Adolescents

Lisa J. Crockett, John E. Schulenberg, Anne C. Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methodology texts frequently emphasize the limitations of self-report measures. Empirical information on the validity of self-report data, however, tends to be limited to particular topics and populations. This paper examines the validity of self-report data in a sample of young adolescents for whom objective and self-report data were available on course grades, height, and weight. A comparison of the two kinds of data generally supported the validity of the self-reports, although there was some evidence of response effects. It was concluded that while young adolescents exhibit some systematic errors in reporting, self-reports can provide a useful substitute for some kinds of objective data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-392
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Adolescent Research
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1987

Fingerprint

Self Report
adolescent
methodology
Weights and Measures
evidence
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Congruence between Objective and Self-Report Data in a Sample of Young Adolescents. / Crockett, Lisa J.; Schulenberg, John E.; Petersen, Anne C.

In: Journal of Adolescent Research, Vol. 2, No. 4, 10.1987, p. 383-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crockett, Lisa J. ; Schulenberg, John E. ; Petersen, Anne C. / Congruence between Objective and Self-Report Data in a Sample of Young Adolescents. In: Journal of Adolescent Research. 1987 ; Vol. 2, No. 4. pp. 383-392.
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