Confronting Sexism as Persuasion

Effects of a Confrontation's Recipient, Source, Message, and Context

Sarah J Gervais, Amy L. Hillard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We applied the message-learning theory of persuasion to examine perceptions of leaders who confront sexism. Participants (N = 283) read vignettes that varied the confrontation message (i.e., directness), source (i.e., confronter gender), and context (i.e., public vs. private). As hypothesized, female (vs. male) participants evaluated confronters more positively and female (vs. male) leaders were evaluated less favorably when they confronted publically. Additionally, participants perceived greater sexism for public (vs. private) confrontation contexts and were more surprised when the confrontation source was a male (vs. female) leader. Implications for confronting and persuasion theories and applications for policymakers are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)653-667
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Social Issues
Volume70
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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sexism
persuasion
recipient
leader
learning theory
gender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Confronting Sexism as Persuasion : Effects of a Confrontation's Recipient, Source, Message, and Context. / Gervais, Sarah J; Hillard, Amy L.

In: Journal of Social Issues, Vol. 70, No. 4, 01.12.2014, p. 653-667.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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