Concurrent validity of neuropsychiatric subgroups on caregiver burden in alzheimer disease patients

Saw Myo Tun, Daniel L Murman, Christopher C. Colenda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: In a previously published study, the authors conceptualized neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients as distinct symptom profiles with differential outcomes. In the present study, our aim was to further examine the validation of the classification by considering its concurrent validity on caregiver burden. Method: As described previously, neuropsychiatric symptoms, as assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, in 122 patients with AD were categorized, using cluster analysis. The presence as well as the severity and frequency of symptoms were both used in the classification. After the classification, group differences in caregiver burden, as measured by Screen for Caregiver Burden, were tested using analysis of covariance. The effects of important covariates, such as functional impairment, comorbid medical conditions, parkinsonism, age, and cognitive functioning, were examined. Results: Based on the presence of symptoms, subgroups differed in the level of caregiver distress in that caregivers of the "minimally symptomatic" and the "affective/apathetic" subgroups experienced less distress than the caregivers of the "highly symptomatic" subgroup. Based on the severity and frequency of symptoms, subgroups differed in such a way that caregivers of the "minimally symptomatic" and the "predominantly apathetic" subgroups endorsed less distress than the caregivers of the "affective" and the "highly symptomatic" subgroups. Conclusion: Neuropsychiatric subgroups were able to differentially predict caregiver burden. The findings appear to lend further support to the validity of classifying neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD patients using cluster analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)594-602
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Caregivers
Alzheimer Disease
Cluster Analysis
Parkinsonian Disorders
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Caregiver burden
  • Neuropsychiatric subgroups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Concurrent validity of neuropsychiatric subgroups on caregiver burden in alzheimer disease patients. / Tun, Saw Myo; Murman, Daniel L; Colenda, Christopher C.

In: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 16, No. 7, 01.01.2008, p. 594-602.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b88c55b00a3d4de8bf5c2804234048e3,
title = "Concurrent validity of neuropsychiatric subgroups on caregiver burden in alzheimer disease patients",
abstract = "Objective: In a previously published study, the authors conceptualized neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients as distinct symptom profiles with differential outcomes. In the present study, our aim was to further examine the validation of the classification by considering its concurrent validity on caregiver burden. Method: As described previously, neuropsychiatric symptoms, as assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, in 122 patients with AD were categorized, using cluster analysis. The presence as well as the severity and frequency of symptoms were both used in the classification. After the classification, group differences in caregiver burden, as measured by Screen for Caregiver Burden, were tested using analysis of covariance. The effects of important covariates, such as functional impairment, comorbid medical conditions, parkinsonism, age, and cognitive functioning, were examined. Results: Based on the presence of symptoms, subgroups differed in the level of caregiver distress in that caregivers of the {"}minimally symptomatic{"} and the {"}affective/apathetic{"} subgroups experienced less distress than the caregivers of the {"}highly symptomatic{"} subgroup. Based on the severity and frequency of symptoms, subgroups differed in such a way that caregivers of the {"}minimally symptomatic{"} and the {"}predominantly apathetic{"} subgroups endorsed less distress than the caregivers of the {"}affective{"} and the {"}highly symptomatic{"} subgroups. Conclusion: Neuropsychiatric subgroups were able to differentially predict caregiver burden. The findings appear to lend further support to the validity of classifying neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD patients using cluster analysis.",
keywords = "Caregiver burden, Neuropsychiatric subgroups",
author = "Tun, {Saw Myo} and Murman, {Daniel L} and Colenda, {Christopher C.}",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/JGP.0b013e318173f5fc",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "594--602",
journal = "American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry",
issn = "1064-7481",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Concurrent validity of neuropsychiatric subgroups on caregiver burden in alzheimer disease patients

AU - Tun, Saw Myo

AU - Murman, Daniel L

AU - Colenda, Christopher C.

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - Objective: In a previously published study, the authors conceptualized neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients as distinct symptom profiles with differential outcomes. In the present study, our aim was to further examine the validation of the classification by considering its concurrent validity on caregiver burden. Method: As described previously, neuropsychiatric symptoms, as assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, in 122 patients with AD were categorized, using cluster analysis. The presence as well as the severity and frequency of symptoms were both used in the classification. After the classification, group differences in caregiver burden, as measured by Screen for Caregiver Burden, were tested using analysis of covariance. The effects of important covariates, such as functional impairment, comorbid medical conditions, parkinsonism, age, and cognitive functioning, were examined. Results: Based on the presence of symptoms, subgroups differed in the level of caregiver distress in that caregivers of the "minimally symptomatic" and the "affective/apathetic" subgroups experienced less distress than the caregivers of the "highly symptomatic" subgroup. Based on the severity and frequency of symptoms, subgroups differed in such a way that caregivers of the "minimally symptomatic" and the "predominantly apathetic" subgroups endorsed less distress than the caregivers of the "affective" and the "highly symptomatic" subgroups. Conclusion: Neuropsychiatric subgroups were able to differentially predict caregiver burden. The findings appear to lend further support to the validity of classifying neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD patients using cluster analysis.

AB - Objective: In a previously published study, the authors conceptualized neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients as distinct symptom profiles with differential outcomes. In the present study, our aim was to further examine the validation of the classification by considering its concurrent validity on caregiver burden. Method: As described previously, neuropsychiatric symptoms, as assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, in 122 patients with AD were categorized, using cluster analysis. The presence as well as the severity and frequency of symptoms were both used in the classification. After the classification, group differences in caregiver burden, as measured by Screen for Caregiver Burden, were tested using analysis of covariance. The effects of important covariates, such as functional impairment, comorbid medical conditions, parkinsonism, age, and cognitive functioning, were examined. Results: Based on the presence of symptoms, subgroups differed in the level of caregiver distress in that caregivers of the "minimally symptomatic" and the "affective/apathetic" subgroups experienced less distress than the caregivers of the "highly symptomatic" subgroup. Based on the severity and frequency of symptoms, subgroups differed in such a way that caregivers of the "minimally symptomatic" and the "predominantly apathetic" subgroups endorsed less distress than the caregivers of the "affective" and the "highly symptomatic" subgroups. Conclusion: Neuropsychiatric subgroups were able to differentially predict caregiver burden. The findings appear to lend further support to the validity of classifying neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD patients using cluster analysis.

KW - Caregiver burden

KW - Neuropsychiatric subgroups

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=50349101628&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=50349101628&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/JGP.0b013e318173f5fc

DO - 10.1097/JGP.0b013e318173f5fc

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 594

EP - 602

JO - American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

JF - American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

SN - 1064-7481

IS - 7

ER -