Concordance of risk factors in female spouses of male patients with coronary heart disease

L. C. Macken, B. Yates, S. Blancher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Shared environment may put marital partners at increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) In this study, the authors examined the degree of concordance of risk factors between men with CHD (n = 177) and their spouses, and described the risk profiles of both patients and spouses. Risk factors examined were smoking, hypertension, obesity, cholesterol level, diet, and exercise. Methods: Data were collected 2 months after the cardiac event using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System tool Concordance between patient and spouse pairs was evaluated using Pearson correlation coefficients (r) for continuous data and phi coefficients (φ) for nominal data. Results: Significant concordance was found between patient and spouse pairs for body mass index, history of smoking, current smoking status, frequency of exercise, miles per exercise session, and the amount of fat and fiber in the diet. There was no significant spousal concordance in relation to the diagnosis of hypertension, systohc and diastolic blood pressure (BP), cholesterol level, history of high cholesterol, current exercise program, duration of exercise, and amount of salt in the diet. Thus, although the physiological indicators of risk (e.g., BP) were not significantly related among marital partners, behavioral indicators of risk (e.g., smoking) were significantly related. Conclusions: The findings suggested that shared lifestyles of marital partners may result in greater risk of CHD for female partners of men with CHD. Furthermore, lifestyle interventions that specifically target the marital partners as a unit may be more efficacious than individual patient education strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-368
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Fingerprint

Spouses
Coronary Disease
Exercise
Smoking
Diet
Blood Pressure
Hypercholesterolemia
Life Style
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Hypertension
Patient Education
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Salts
Fats
Cholesterol

Keywords

  • BRFSS
  • Concordance
  • Coronary risk factors
  • Spouse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Concordance of risk factors in female spouses of male patients with coronary heart disease. / Macken, L. C.; Yates, B.; Blancher, S.

In: Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, Vol. 20, No. 6, 01.01.2000, p. 361-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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