Computer science is different! Educational psychology experiments do not reliably replicate in programming domain

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

My research explores how learning computer science, specifically programming, differs from learning math or science in relation to educational psychological principles. I have replicated well established experiments from the science and math domains by using instructional design techniques that minimize the cognitive load imposed on the learner. Instead of receiving the expected results confirming that the educational psychology principles also apply to computing, I received unexpected results contrary to the original hypotheses which indicate that merely adapting these principles to a new domain is not enough. I seek to understand what differences exist in learning programming, as compared to the other problem solving domains that explain the confusing experimental results I obtained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationICER 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages267-268
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9781450336284
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 9 2015
Event11th Annual ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research, ICER 2015 - Omaha, United States
Duration: Aug 9 2015Aug 13 2015

Publication series

NameICER 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research

Other

Other11th Annual ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research, ICER 2015
CountryUnited States
CityOmaha
Period8/9/158/13/15

Fingerprint

educational psychology
Computer programming
computer science
Computer science
programming
experiment
learning
Experiments
science

Keywords

  • Multi-modality code explanation
  • Subgoal labels
  • Worked examples

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Morrison, B. B. (2015). Computer science is different! Educational psychology experiments do not reliably replicate in programming domain. In ICER 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research (pp. 267-268). (ICER 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/2787622.2787744

Computer science is different! Educational psychology experiments do not reliably replicate in programming domain. / Morrison, Briana B.

ICER 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2015. p. 267-268 (ICER 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Morrison, BB 2015, Computer science is different! Educational psychology experiments do not reliably replicate in programming domain. in ICER 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research. ICER 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 267-268, 11th Annual ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research, ICER 2015, Omaha, United States, 8/9/15. https://doi.org/10.1145/2787622.2787744
Morrison BB. Computer science is different! Educational psychology experiments do not reliably replicate in programming domain. In ICER 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 2015. p. 267-268. (ICER 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research). https://doi.org/10.1145/2787622.2787744
Morrison, Briana B. / Computer science is different! Educational psychology experiments do not reliably replicate in programming domain. ICER 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2015. pp. 267-268 (ICER 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM Conference on International Computing Education Research).
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