Abstract

Thirteen patients with head and neck cancer underwent staging by clinical examination, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a standardized blinded fashion. All patients subsequently underwent radical neck dissection with subsequent pathologic staging. CT and MRI each predicted 93% of staging results correctly, with clinical examination correct 67% of the time. Staging of primary tumors had an accuracy of 90% by clinical examination, 40% by CT, and 50% by MRI when compared to staging of the pathologic specimen. Understaging was seen in 50% of CT scans and 30% of MRI scans. We believe either CT or MRI should be considered for routine staging of the neck in all head and neck malignancies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)422-425
Number of pages4
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume101
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Staging
Neck
Neck Dissection
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Head
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of cervical metastasis. / Lydiatt, D. D.; Markin, Rodney Smith; Williams, S. M.; Davis, Leon Franklin; Yonkers, A. J.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 101, No. 4, 01.01.1989, p. 422-425.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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