Computational model of evolving lens capsule biomechanics following cataract-like surgery

R. M. Pedrigi, J. D. Humphrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cataract surgery is an invasive procedure whereby lens fibers are removed through a permanent central hole, or capsulorhexis, in the surrounding lens capsule and replaced with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL). Remnant lens epithelial cells subsequently transdifferentiate to a more contractile and synthetic wound-healing phenotype, which causes significant structural and mechanical adaptations of the residual lens capsule. The goal of this study is to present a computational model capable of capturing salient features of the biomechanical evolution of the lens capsule following cataract-like surgery. The model is shown to predict marked long-term increases in thickness and stiffness of the lens capsule nearest the edge of the capsulorhexis comparable to reported measurements. Such models represent a first step toward understanding better the long-term interactions between the residual lens capsule and implanted IOL, thus initiating a new paradigm for the design of improved IOLs, including those having an accommodative feature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)537-548
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of biomedical engineering
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Biomechanics
Surgery
Lenses
Intraocular lenses
Stiffness
Fibers

Keywords

  • Intraocular lens
  • Mechanical properties
  • Posterior capsule opacification
  • Stress-mediated adaptation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Computational model of evolving lens capsule biomechanics following cataract-like surgery. / Pedrigi, R. M.; Humphrey, J. D.

In: Annals of biomedical engineering, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 537-548.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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