Composition, in vitro digestibility, and sensory evaluation of extruded whole grain sorghum breakfast cereals

Nyambe L. Mkandawire, Steven A. Weier, Curtis L. Weller, David S. Jackson, Devin J. Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two sorghum genotypes (red, tannin; white, non-tannin), were evaluated for their potential use in breakfast cereals. Two levels of whole grain sorghum flour (550g/kg dry mix or 700g/kg dry mix) were processed per genotype using a pilot-scale, twin screw extruder. A whole grain oat-based cereal was used as a reference. White sorghum cereals (WSC) had significantly (p<0.05) higher starch, brightness (L*), and yellowness (b*) than red sorghum cereals (RSC). RSC had higher protein and bulk density than the WSC. Cereals made with 700g sorghum flour/kg were smaller and denser with lower water solubility and absorption indices than those made with 550g/kg. Invitro protein digestibility of the RSC (43-58%) was significantly reduced compared with the WSC (69-73%) and the reference sample (72%). WSC with 700g sorghum flour/kg contained significantly more resistant starch than the RSC cereals and the oat reference (208g/kg starch versus 81-147g/kg starch, respectively). Overall acceptability and texture of sorghum cereals did not differ significantly from the oat reference, although appearance and aroma liking were significantly reduced. Therefore, non-tannin sorghum has potential to be used in the breakfast cereal industry with minimal impact on nutritional profile and sensory properties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)662-667
Number of pages6
JournalLWT - Food Science and Technology
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

Fingerprint

breakfast cereals
Sorghum
Breakfast
whole grain foods
in vitro digestibility
grain sorghum
sensory evaluation
sorghum flour
Starch
Flour
oats
starch
In Vitro Techniques
Edible Grain
Whole Grains
whole grain flour
Genotype
extruders
resistant starch
genotype

Keywords

  • Extrusion
  • Protein
  • Resistant starch
  • Tannins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Composition, in vitro digestibility, and sensory evaluation of extruded whole grain sorghum breakfast cereals. / Mkandawire, Nyambe L.; Weier, Steven A.; Weller, Curtis L.; Jackson, David S.; Rose, Devin J.

In: LWT - Food Science and Technology, Vol. 62, No. 1, 01.06.2015, p. 662-667.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mkandawire, Nyambe L. ; Weier, Steven A. ; Weller, Curtis L. ; Jackson, David S. ; Rose, Devin J. / Composition, in vitro digestibility, and sensory evaluation of extruded whole grain sorghum breakfast cereals. In: LWT - Food Science and Technology. 2015 ; Vol. 62, No. 1. pp. 662-667.
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