Comparison of serum amyloid A and C‐reactive protein as indicators of lung inflammation in corticosteroid treated and non‐corticosteroid treated cystic fibrosis patients

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Abstract

Serum amyloid A (SAA) and C‐reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared in 830 serum samples from 155 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Correlation coefficients were calculated for all samples (r=0.73), for samples from non‐corticosteroid treated (CFNS) patients (n=698, r=0.80), and for samples from corticosteroid treated (CFS) patients (n=132, r=0.35). SAA was the more sensitive indicator of pulmonary inflammation when SAA and CRP were compared to pulmonary function tests of 49 hospitalized patients at admission and discharge. CRP levels were significantly (p<.05) lower at admission in CFS patients than in CFNS patients, whereas SAA levels were not significantly different between the two groups. All nine CFS patients hospitalized had elevated SAA levels (average 22 times above normal limits) at admission, while only six had elevated CRP levels (average 3.7 times above normal limits) at admission. In the 40 CFNS patients both SAA and CRP levels were significantly elevated at admission. In each case SAA and CRP levels declined as pulmonary functions improved with effective antimicrobial therapy. In three instances SAA levels increased during hospitalization while CRP levels did not. In each case, rising SAA levels indicated clinical deterioration associated with evolving resistance of P. aeruginosa which required a change in antibiotic therapy. © 1992 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-224
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Serum Amyloid A Protein
Cystic Fibrosis
Pneumonia
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Proteins
Patient Discharge
Patient Admission
Respiratory Function Tests
Deterioration
Hospitalization
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Lung

Keywords

  • acute phase reactants
  • acute phase response
  • glucocorticoids
  • prednisolone
  • prednisone
  • pulmonary function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Hematology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Medical Laboratory Technology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

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abstract = "Serum amyloid A (SAA) and C‐reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared in 830 serum samples from 155 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Correlation coefficients were calculated for all samples (r=0.73), for samples from non‐corticosteroid treated (CFNS) patients (n=698, r=0.80), and for samples from corticosteroid treated (CFS) patients (n=132, r=0.35). SAA was the more sensitive indicator of pulmonary inflammation when SAA and CRP were compared to pulmonary function tests of 49 hospitalized patients at admission and discharge. CRP levels were significantly (p<.05) lower at admission in CFS patients than in CFNS patients, whereas SAA levels were not significantly different between the two groups. All nine CFS patients hospitalized had elevated SAA levels (average 22 times above normal limits) at admission, while only six had elevated CRP levels (average 3.7 times above normal limits) at admission. In the 40 CFNS patients both SAA and CRP levels were significantly elevated at admission. In each case SAA and CRP levels declined as pulmonary functions improved with effective antimicrobial therapy. In three instances SAA levels increased during hospitalization while CRP levels did not. In each case, rising SAA levels indicated clinical deterioration associated with evolving resistance of P. aeruginosa which required a change in antibiotic therapy. {\circledC} 1992 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.",
keywords = "acute phase reactants, acute phase response, glucocorticoids, prednisolone, prednisone, pulmonary function",
author = "Smith, {J. W.} and Colombo, {John Louis} and McDonald, {Thomas L}",
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AU - Colombo, John Louis

AU - McDonald, Thomas L

PY - 1992

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N2 - Serum amyloid A (SAA) and C‐reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared in 830 serum samples from 155 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Correlation coefficients were calculated for all samples (r=0.73), for samples from non‐corticosteroid treated (CFNS) patients (n=698, r=0.80), and for samples from corticosteroid treated (CFS) patients (n=132, r=0.35). SAA was the more sensitive indicator of pulmonary inflammation when SAA and CRP were compared to pulmonary function tests of 49 hospitalized patients at admission and discharge. CRP levels were significantly (p<.05) lower at admission in CFS patients than in CFNS patients, whereas SAA levels were not significantly different between the two groups. All nine CFS patients hospitalized had elevated SAA levels (average 22 times above normal limits) at admission, while only six had elevated CRP levels (average 3.7 times above normal limits) at admission. In the 40 CFNS patients both SAA and CRP levels were significantly elevated at admission. In each case SAA and CRP levels declined as pulmonary functions improved with effective antimicrobial therapy. In three instances SAA levels increased during hospitalization while CRP levels did not. In each case, rising SAA levels indicated clinical deterioration associated with evolving resistance of P. aeruginosa which required a change in antibiotic therapy. © 1992 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

AB - Serum amyloid A (SAA) and C‐reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared in 830 serum samples from 155 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Correlation coefficients were calculated for all samples (r=0.73), for samples from non‐corticosteroid treated (CFNS) patients (n=698, r=0.80), and for samples from corticosteroid treated (CFS) patients (n=132, r=0.35). SAA was the more sensitive indicator of pulmonary inflammation when SAA and CRP were compared to pulmonary function tests of 49 hospitalized patients at admission and discharge. CRP levels were significantly (p<.05) lower at admission in CFS patients than in CFNS patients, whereas SAA levels were not significantly different between the two groups. All nine CFS patients hospitalized had elevated SAA levels (average 22 times above normal limits) at admission, while only six had elevated CRP levels (average 3.7 times above normal limits) at admission. In the 40 CFNS patients both SAA and CRP levels were significantly elevated at admission. In each case SAA and CRP levels declined as pulmonary functions improved with effective antimicrobial therapy. In three instances SAA levels increased during hospitalization while CRP levels did not. In each case, rising SAA levels indicated clinical deterioration associated with evolving resistance of P. aeruginosa which required a change in antibiotic therapy. © 1992 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

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