Comparison of resource utilization and clinical outcomes between teaching and nonteaching medical services

Amir A. Khaliq, Chiung Yu Huang, Apar Kishor P Ganti, Kristie Invie, Raymond A. Smego

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To compare the resource utilization and clinical outcomes of medical care delivered on general internal medicine inpatient services at teaching and nonteaching services at an academic hospital. Methods: From February to October 2002, 2189 patients admitted to a 450-bed university-affiliated community hospital were assigned either to a resident-staffed teaching service (n = 1637) or to a hospitalist- or clinic-based internist nonteaching service (n = 552). We compared total hospital costs per patient, length of hospital stay (LOS), hospital readmission within 30 days, in-hospital mortality, and costs for pharmacy, laboratory, radiology, and others between teaching and nonteaching services. Results: Care on a teaching service was not associated with increased overall patient care costs ($5572 vs. $5576; P = .99), LOS (4.92 days vs. 5.10 days; P = .43), readmission rate (12.3% vs. 10.3%; P = .21), or in-hospital mortality (3.7% vs. 4.5%; P = .40). Mean laboratory and radiology costs were higher on the teaching service, but costs for the pharmacy and for speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, respiratory therapy, pulmonary function testing, and GI endoscopy procedures were not statistically different between the 2 services, and residents did not order more tests or procedures. Case mix and illness severity, as reflected by the distribution of the most frequent DRGs and mean number of secondary diagnoses per patient and DRG-specific LOS, were similar on the 2 services. Conclusions: At our academic hospital, admission to a general internal medicine teaching service resulted in patient care costs and clinical outcomes comparable to those admitted to a nonteaching service.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-157
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of hospital medicine
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

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Length of Stay
Teaching
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Costs and Cost Analysis
Hospital Costs
Internal Medicine
Hospital Mortality
Radiology
Patient Care
Hospitalists
Speech Therapy
Respiratory Therapy
Patient Readmission
Pharmaceutical Services
Occupational Therapy
Community Hospital
Endoscopy
Inpatients
Lung
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Clinical outcomes
  • Medical residents
  • Patient care costs
  • Resource utilization
  • Teaching hospital

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Internal Medicine
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning
  • Assessment and Diagnosis

Cite this

Comparison of resource utilization and clinical outcomes between teaching and nonteaching medical services. / Khaliq, Amir A.; Huang, Chiung Yu; Ganti, Apar Kishor P; Invie, Kristie; Smego, Raymond A.

In: Journal of hospital medicine, Vol. 2, No. 3, 01.05.2007, p. 150-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khaliq, Amir A. ; Huang, Chiung Yu ; Ganti, Apar Kishor P ; Invie, Kristie ; Smego, Raymond A. / Comparison of resource utilization and clinical outcomes between teaching and nonteaching medical services. In: Journal of hospital medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 150-157.
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