Comparison of physical and performance characteristics of NCAA division I football players: 1987 and 2000

Craig A. Secora, Richard W. Latin, Kris E. Berg, John M. Noble

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare normative data from present Division I National Collegiate Athletic Association football teams to those from 1987. Players were divided into 8 positions for comparisons: quarter-backs (QB), running backs (RB), receivers (WR), tight ends (TE), offensive linemen (OL), defensive linemen (DL), linebackers (LB), and defensive backs (DB). Comparisons included height, body mass, bench press and squat strength, vertical jump, vertical jump power, 40-yd-dash speed, and body composition. Independent t-tests were used to analyze the data with level of significance set at p < 0.01. Significant differences (p < 0.01) were found in 50 of 88 comparisons. From 1987 until 2000, Division I college football players in general have become bigger, stronger, faster, and more powerful. Further research is warranted to investigate if these trends will continue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-291
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of strength and conditioning research
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2004

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Football
Body Height
Body Composition
Running
Sports
Research

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Longitudinal study
  • Vertical jump power

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Comparison of physical and performance characteristics of NCAA division I football players : 1987 and 2000. / Secora, Craig A.; Latin, Richard W.; Berg, Kris E.; Noble, John M.

In: Journal of strength and conditioning research, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.05.2004, p. 286-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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