Comparison of obese adults with poor versus good sleep quality during a functional neuroimaging delay discounting task: A pilot study

Laura E. Martin, Lauren Pollack, Ashley McCune, Erica Schulte, Cary R. Savage, Jennifer D. Lundgren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to determine if obese adults with poor versus good sleep quality demonstrate reduced self-regulatory capacity and different patterns of neural activation when making impulsive monetary choices. Six obese, good quality sleepers (M age=44.7 years, M BMI=38.1 kg/m2) were compared to 13 obese, poor quality sleepers (M age=42.6, M BMI=39.2kg/m2) on sleep and eating behavior and brain activation in prefrontal and insular regions while engaging in a delay discounting task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Poor quality sleepers demonstrated significantly lower brain activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, and bilateral insula when making immediate and smaller (impulsive) monetary choices compared to the baseline condition. Behaviorally, poor compared to good quality sleepers reported higher scores in the night eating questionnaire. Obese adults with poor sleep quality demonstrate decreased brain activation in multiple regions that regulate cognitive control and interceptive awareness, possibly reducing self-regulatory capacity when making immediately gratifying decisions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-95
Number of pages6
JournalPsychiatry Research - Neuroimaging
Volume234
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 30 2015

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Functional Neuroimaging
Sleep
Brain
Feeding Behavior
Prefrontal Cortex
Eating
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Delay Discounting

Keywords

  • Brain activation
  • Delay discounting
  • Obesity
  • Self-regulation
  • Sleep quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Comparison of obese adults with poor versus good sleep quality during a functional neuroimaging delay discounting task : A pilot study. / Martin, Laura E.; Pollack, Lauren; McCune, Ashley; Schulte, Erica; Savage, Cary R.; Lundgren, Jennifer D.

In: Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging, Vol. 234, No. 1, 30.10.2015, p. 90-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, Laura E. ; Pollack, Lauren ; McCune, Ashley ; Schulte, Erica ; Savage, Cary R. ; Lundgren, Jennifer D. / Comparison of obese adults with poor versus good sleep quality during a functional neuroimaging delay discounting task : A pilot study. In: Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging. 2015 ; Vol. 234, No. 1. pp. 90-95.
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