Comparison of integrated behavioral health treatment for internalizing psychiatric disorders in patients with and without type 2 diabetes

Arthur R. Andrews, Debbie Gomez, Austin Larey, Hayden Pacl, Dennis Burchette, Juventino Hernandez Rodriguez, Freddie A. Pastrana, Ana J. Bridges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes is often comorbid with internalizing mental health disorders and associated with greater psychiatric treatment resistance. Integrating psychotherapy into primary care can help treat internalizing disorders generally. We explored whether such treatment had comparable effectiveness in patients with and without Type 2 diabetes. Method: Participants were 468 consecutive adults (23% male 62% Hispanic,Mage=41.46 years) referred by medical staff for psychotherapy appointments to address internalizing symptoms (e.g., depression). After each visit, patients completed a self-report measure and clinicians assessed patient symptom severity. These data and demographics extracted from electronic medical records were analyzed using descriptive and multilevel modeling analyses. Results: Patients with and without diabetes were similar in types of internalizing disorders experienced and baseline clinician- and self-reported symptomology. Multilevel modeling suggested improvements in self-reported symptomology was comparable across patient groups; however, only patients without diabetes significantly improved according to clinician reports. Discussion: Although findings suggested integrated psychotherapy resulted in comparable patient-reported reductions of internalizing symptoms, these effects were not evident in clinician reports of diabetic patients. Possible reasons for this discrepancy (e.g., reporting biases) are discussed. Integrated psychotherapy for internalizing disorders may be effective for Type 2 diabetic patients, though caution is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-377
Number of pages11
JournalFamilies, Systems and Health
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Psychiatry
Health
Psychotherapy
Therapeutics
Multilevel Analysis
Electronic Health Records
Medical Staff
Hispanic Americans
Mental Disorders
Self Report
Primary Health Care
Appointments and Schedules
Mental Health
Demography
Depression

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Diabetes
  • Integrated behavioral health
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Comparison of integrated behavioral health treatment for internalizing psychiatric disorders in patients with and without type 2 diabetes. / Andrews, Arthur R.; Gomez, Debbie; Larey, Austin; Pacl, Hayden; Burchette, Dennis; Rodriguez, Juventino Hernandez; Pastrana, Freddie A.; Bridges, Ana J.

In: Families, Systems and Health, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.12.2016, p. 367-377.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Andrews, Arthur R. ; Gomez, Debbie ; Larey, Austin ; Pacl, Hayden ; Burchette, Dennis ; Rodriguez, Juventino Hernandez ; Pastrana, Freddie A. ; Bridges, Ana J. / Comparison of integrated behavioral health treatment for internalizing psychiatric disorders in patients with and without type 2 diabetes. In: Families, Systems and Health. 2016 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 367-377.
@article{3c30b97488a045b9b14903d31a3fa6cf,
title = "Comparison of integrated behavioral health treatment for internalizing psychiatric disorders in patients with and without type 2 diabetes",
abstract = "Type 2 diabetes is often comorbid with internalizing mental health disorders and associated with greater psychiatric treatment resistance. Integrating psychotherapy into primary care can help treat internalizing disorders generally. We explored whether such treatment had comparable effectiveness in patients with and without Type 2 diabetes. Method: Participants were 468 consecutive adults (23{\%} male 62{\%} Hispanic,Mage=41.46 years) referred by medical staff for psychotherapy appointments to address internalizing symptoms (e.g., depression). After each visit, patients completed a self-report measure and clinicians assessed patient symptom severity. These data and demographics extracted from electronic medical records were analyzed using descriptive and multilevel modeling analyses. Results: Patients with and without diabetes were similar in types of internalizing disorders experienced and baseline clinician- and self-reported symptomology. Multilevel modeling suggested improvements in self-reported symptomology was comparable across patient groups; however, only patients without diabetes significantly improved according to clinician reports. Discussion: Although findings suggested integrated psychotherapy resulted in comparable patient-reported reductions of internalizing symptoms, these effects were not evident in clinician reports of diabetic patients. Possible reasons for this discrepancy (e.g., reporting biases) are discussed. Integrated psychotherapy for internalizing disorders may be effective for Type 2 diabetic patients, though caution is warranted.",
keywords = "Anxiety, Depression, Diabetes, Integrated behavioral health, Treatment",
author = "Andrews, {Arthur R.} and Debbie Gomez and Austin Larey and Hayden Pacl and Dennis Burchette and Rodriguez, {Juventino Hernandez} and Pastrana, {Freddie A.} and Bridges, {Ana J.}",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/fsh0000224",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "367--377",
journal = "Families, Systems and Health",
issn = "1091-7527",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of integrated behavioral health treatment for internalizing psychiatric disorders in patients with and without type 2 diabetes

AU - Andrews, Arthur R.

AU - Gomez, Debbie

AU - Larey, Austin

AU - Pacl, Hayden

AU - Burchette, Dennis

AU - Rodriguez, Juventino Hernandez

AU - Pastrana, Freddie A.

AU - Bridges, Ana J.

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - Type 2 diabetes is often comorbid with internalizing mental health disorders and associated with greater psychiatric treatment resistance. Integrating psychotherapy into primary care can help treat internalizing disorders generally. We explored whether such treatment had comparable effectiveness in patients with and without Type 2 diabetes. Method: Participants were 468 consecutive adults (23% male 62% Hispanic,Mage=41.46 years) referred by medical staff for psychotherapy appointments to address internalizing symptoms (e.g., depression). After each visit, patients completed a self-report measure and clinicians assessed patient symptom severity. These data and demographics extracted from electronic medical records were analyzed using descriptive and multilevel modeling analyses. Results: Patients with and without diabetes were similar in types of internalizing disorders experienced and baseline clinician- and self-reported symptomology. Multilevel modeling suggested improvements in self-reported symptomology was comparable across patient groups; however, only patients without diabetes significantly improved according to clinician reports. Discussion: Although findings suggested integrated psychotherapy resulted in comparable patient-reported reductions of internalizing symptoms, these effects were not evident in clinician reports of diabetic patients. Possible reasons for this discrepancy (e.g., reporting biases) are discussed. Integrated psychotherapy for internalizing disorders may be effective for Type 2 diabetic patients, though caution is warranted.

AB - Type 2 diabetes is often comorbid with internalizing mental health disorders and associated with greater psychiatric treatment resistance. Integrating psychotherapy into primary care can help treat internalizing disorders generally. We explored whether such treatment had comparable effectiveness in patients with and without Type 2 diabetes. Method: Participants were 468 consecutive adults (23% male 62% Hispanic,Mage=41.46 years) referred by medical staff for psychotherapy appointments to address internalizing symptoms (e.g., depression). After each visit, patients completed a self-report measure and clinicians assessed patient symptom severity. These data and demographics extracted from electronic medical records were analyzed using descriptive and multilevel modeling analyses. Results: Patients with and without diabetes were similar in types of internalizing disorders experienced and baseline clinician- and self-reported symptomology. Multilevel modeling suggested improvements in self-reported symptomology was comparable across patient groups; however, only patients without diabetes significantly improved according to clinician reports. Discussion: Although findings suggested integrated psychotherapy resulted in comparable patient-reported reductions of internalizing symptoms, these effects were not evident in clinician reports of diabetic patients. Possible reasons for this discrepancy (e.g., reporting biases) are discussed. Integrated psychotherapy for internalizing disorders may be effective for Type 2 diabetic patients, though caution is warranted.

KW - Anxiety

KW - Depression

KW - Diabetes

KW - Integrated behavioral health

KW - Treatment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84988663793&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84988663793&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/fsh0000224

DO - 10.1037/fsh0000224

M3 - Article

C2 - 27669050

AN - SCOPUS:84988663793

VL - 34

SP - 367

EP - 377

JO - Families, Systems and Health

JF - Families, Systems and Health

SN - 1091-7527

IS - 4

ER -