Communication interaction differences communication between natural speakers and AAC users with traumatic brain injury

K. Hux, R. Burke, J. Elliot, M. Ross, T. Hrnicek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explored differences in communication mode and function between survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI) who rely on natural speech and survivors of TBI who rely on text-to-speech augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices as a primary means of communication. Four adults, ranging in age from 26 to 33 years, were each observed for 2 hours of conversational interaction with peers and/or staff members of a transitional living facility. Results showed that, although AAC users and natural speakers spent equivalent amounts of time in the listening mode, AAC users initiated less conversation, produced fewer questions and comments, and spent substantially more time in message generation than natural speakers. Although the introduction of text-to-speech devices to nonspeaking survivors of TBI can solve many communication problems, professionals must weigh the relative benefits and drawbacks of relying on such systems and encourage the use of multiple communication modes to express a variety of intents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-86
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology
Volume9
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Communication
Equipment and Supplies
Traumatic Brain Injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Communication interaction differences communication between natural speakers and AAC users with traumatic brain injury. / Hux, K.; Burke, R.; Elliot, J.; Ross, M.; Hrnicek, T.

In: Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.01.2001, p. 71-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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