Communicated Perspective-Taking During Stories of Marital Stress: Spouses' Perceptions of One Another's Perspective-Taking Behaviors

Jody Koenig Kellas, Erin K. Willer, April R. Trees

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Perspective-taking has important connections to social and relational functioning, making it an important skill for marital adjustment (Long & Andrews, 1990). The current study investigated the types of behaviors indicative of communicated perspective-taking from the participant perspective as couples told stories of stressful relational events. Using a stimulated recall procedure, 68 husband and wife pairs jointly told the story of a stressful relational experience and then separately viewed their videotaped interaction and evaluated their spouses' perspective-taking behaviors. Agreement, attentiveness, relevant contributions, coordination, positive tone, and freedom represented the categories of behaviors spouses judged to reflect perspective-taking. In contrast, disagreement, inattentiveness, irrelevant contributions, lack of coordination, negative tone, and constraint all emerged as categories of behaviors lacking in perspective-taking. Findings also indicated that disagreement, attentiveness, inattentiveness, negative tone, coordination, lack of coordination, and constraint were significantly related to general judgments of perspective-taking for husbands. For wives, on the other hand, disagreement, inattentiveness, irrelevant contributions, and constraint were the only significant negative correlates of general perspective-taking judgments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-351
Number of pages26
JournalSouthern Communication Journal
Volume78
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 11 2013

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Communicated Perspective-Taking During Stories of Marital Stress : Spouses' Perceptions of One Another's Perspective-Taking Behaviors. / Koenig Kellas, Jody; Willer, Erin K.; Trees, April R.

In: Southern Communication Journal, Vol. 78, No. 4, 11.09.2013, p. 326-351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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