Common pulmonary vein atresia

The role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

G. G. Dudell, M. L. Evans, H. F. Krous, Robert L Spicer, J. J. Lamberti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Common pulmonary vein atresia is a rare form of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which the pulmonary veins join to form a blind confluence that does not communicate with the heart or the major systemic veins. Twenty-one cases have been reported since the lesion was first described in 1962; only two patients with this lesion have survived. Over a 4-year period, common pulmonary vein atresia was diagnosed in five newborns referred to the San Diego Regional Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Program. All five improved dramatically as a result of venoarterial bypass. Congenital heart disease was diagnosed at autopsy in the initial case and by cardiac ultrasound and/or catheterization in the others. Surgical repair was attempted in three neonates; all three required continued extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support postoperatively because of pulmonary hypertension and severe pulmonary parenchymal disease. One infant died of respiratory insufficiency at 3 months of age. The other two survived and were discharged from the hospital. The diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas posed by this lesion and the life-saving potential for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in this rapidly fatal cardiac anomaly are the bases of this report.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-410
Number of pages8
JournalPediatrics
Volume91
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Atresia
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Pulmonary Veins
Heart Diseases
Newborn Infant
Pulmonary Hypertension
Catheterization
Respiratory Insufficiency
Lung Diseases
Autopsy
Veins
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • common pulmonary vein atresia
  • congenital heart disease
  • extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Dudell, G. G., Evans, M. L., Krous, H. F., Spicer, R. L., & Lamberti, J. J. (1993). Common pulmonary vein atresia: The role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Pediatrics, 91(2), 403-410.

Common pulmonary vein atresia : The role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. / Dudell, G. G.; Evans, M. L.; Krous, H. F.; Spicer, Robert L; Lamberti, J. J.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 91, No. 2, 01.01.1993, p. 403-410.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dudell, GG, Evans, ML, Krous, HF, Spicer, RL & Lamberti, JJ 1993, 'Common pulmonary vein atresia: The role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation', Pediatrics, vol. 91, no. 2, pp. 403-410.
Dudell GG, Evans ML, Krous HF, Spicer RL, Lamberti JJ. Common pulmonary vein atresia: The role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Pediatrics. 1993 Jan 1;91(2):403-410.
Dudell, G. G. ; Evans, M. L. ; Krous, H. F. ; Spicer, Robert L ; Lamberti, J. J. / Common pulmonary vein atresia : The role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. In: Pediatrics. 1993 ; Vol. 91, No. 2. pp. 403-410.
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