Comfortable approach distance with small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

Brittany A. Duncan, Robin R. Murphy

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents the first known human-subject study of comfortable approach distance and height for human interaction with a small unmanned aerial vehicle (sUAV), finding no conclusive difference in comfort with a sUAV approaching a human at above head height or below head height. Understanding the amount, if any, of discomfort introduced by a sUAV flying in close proximity to a human is critical for law enforcement, crowd control, entertainment, or flying personal assistants. Previous work has focused on how humans interact with each other or with unmanned ground vehicles, and the experimental methods typically rely on the human participant to consciously express distress. The approach taken was to duplicate the experimental set up in human proxemics studies, while adding psychophysiological sensing, under the hypothesis that human-robot interaction will mirror human-human interaction. The 16 participant, within-subjects experiment did not confirm this hypothesis. Instead a sUAV above height of a 'tall' person in human experiments (2.13 m) did not produce statistically different heart rate variability nor cause the participant to stop the robot further away than for a sUAV at a 'short' height (1.52 m). The lack of effect may be due to two possible confounds: i) duplicating prior human proxemics experiments did not capture how a sUAV would likely move or interact and ii) telling the participants that the robot could not hurt them. Despite possible confounding, the results raise the question of whether human-human psychological and physical distancing behavior transfers to human-aerial robot interactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication22nd IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication
Subtitle of host publication"Living Together, Enjoying Together, and Working Together with Robots!", IEEE RO-MAN 2013
Pages786-792
Number of pages7
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 11 2013
Event22nd IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication: "Living Together, Enjoying Together, and Working Together with Robots!", IEEE RO-MAN 2013 - Gyeongju, Korea, Republic of
Duration: Aug 26 2013Aug 29 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication

Other

Other22nd IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication: "Living Together, Enjoying Together, and Working Together with Robots!", IEEE RO-MAN 2013
CountryKorea, Republic of
CityGyeongju
Period8/26/138/29/13

Fingerprint

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV)
Robots
Unmanned vehicles
Human robot interaction
Ground vehicles
Experiments
Law enforcement
Mirrors
Antennas

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Human-Computer Interaction

Cite this

Duncan, B. A., & Murphy, R. R. (2013). Comfortable approach distance with small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. In 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication: "Living Together, Enjoying Together, and Working Together with Robots!", IEEE RO-MAN 2013 (pp. 786-792). [6628409] (Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication). https://doi.org/10.1109/ROMAN.2013.6628409

Comfortable approach distance with small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. / Duncan, Brittany A.; Murphy, Robin R.

22nd IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication: "Living Together, Enjoying Together, and Working Together with Robots!", IEEE RO-MAN 2013. 2013. p. 786-792 6628409 (Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Duncan, BA & Murphy, RR 2013, Comfortable approach distance with small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. in 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication: "Living Together, Enjoying Together, and Working Together with Robots!", IEEE RO-MAN 2013., 6628409, Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, pp. 786-792, 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication: "Living Together, Enjoying Together, and Working Together with Robots!", IEEE RO-MAN 2013, Gyeongju, Korea, Republic of, 8/26/13. https://doi.org/10.1109/ROMAN.2013.6628409
Duncan BA, Murphy RR. Comfortable approach distance with small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. In 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication: "Living Together, Enjoying Together, and Working Together with Robots!", IEEE RO-MAN 2013. 2013. p. 786-792. 6628409. (Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication). https://doi.org/10.1109/ROMAN.2013.6628409
Duncan, Brittany A. ; Murphy, Robin R. / Comfortable approach distance with small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. 22nd IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication: "Living Together, Enjoying Together, and Working Together with Robots!", IEEE RO-MAN 2013. 2013. pp. 786-792 (Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication).
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