Colostral immunoglobulin concentrations in Holstein and Guernsey cows

Jeff W. Tyler, Barry J. Steevens, Douglas E. Hostetler, Julie M. Holle, John L. Denbigh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To compare the concentration of IgG in colostrum between Holstein and Guernsey cows and among cows of various lactations. Design - Cross-sectional cohort study. Sample Population - Colostrum samples from 77 Holstein and 24 Guernsey cows. Procedure - Colostrum samples were obtained from 101 cows. Colostral IgG concentration was determined, using a radial immunodiffusion assay. Regression analysis was used to determine the effect of breed and lactation number on colostral IgG concentration. Survival analysis and t-tests were used to compare the proportion of colostrum samples that would provide 100 g of IgG for various volumes of colostral intake. Results - Guernsey cows produced 36.4 g of IgG/L of colostrum more than that of Holstein cows. Cows in the third or greater lactation produced 19.5 g of IgG/L of colostrum more than that of first-lactation cows. The IgG concentration of colostrum produced by second-lactation cows did not differ significantly from that produced by first-lactation cows. The colostral IgG concentration of these Holstein and Guernsey cows was higher than values that have been reported elsewhere. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Volume of colostrum needed to meet IgG intake goals is probably lower for Guernsey cows than Holstein cows. Colostrum from first-lactation cows was adequate in IgG content. The practice of discarding colostrum from first-lactation cows on the basis of inadequate IgG content was not justified in this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1136-1139
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume60
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 1999

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Guernsey
Colostrum
immunoglobulins
Immunoglobulins
Holstein
Immunoglobulin G
Lactation
colostrum
cows
lactation
Immunodiffusion
Survival Analysis
sampling
lactation number

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Tyler, J. W., Steevens, B. J., Hostetler, D. E., Holle, J. M., & Denbigh, J. L. (1999). Colostral immunoglobulin concentrations in Holstein and Guernsey cows. American journal of veterinary research, 60(9), 1136-1139.

Colostral immunoglobulin concentrations in Holstein and Guernsey cows. / Tyler, Jeff W.; Steevens, Barry J.; Hostetler, Douglas E.; Holle, Julie M.; Denbigh, John L.

In: American journal of veterinary research, Vol. 60, No. 9, 01.09.1999, p. 1136-1139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tyler, JW, Steevens, BJ, Hostetler, DE, Holle, JM & Denbigh, JL 1999, 'Colostral immunoglobulin concentrations in Holstein and Guernsey cows', American journal of veterinary research, vol. 60, no. 9, pp. 1136-1139.
Tyler, Jeff W. ; Steevens, Barry J. ; Hostetler, Douglas E. ; Holle, Julie M. ; Denbigh, John L. / Colostral immunoglobulin concentrations in Holstein and Guernsey cows. In: American journal of veterinary research. 1999 ; Vol. 60, No. 9. pp. 1136-1139.
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