Collection of autologous peripheral blood stem cells in steady state

Margaret Anne Kessinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Cells normally present in the circulation are capable of providing sustained haematopoietic function in a manner similar to cells normally present in the bone marrow, when transplanted to an autologous or allogeneic recipient. The function of these circulating cells is not known, but they may serve as a reservoir of haematopoietic stem cells which can migrate via the blood stream to sites of need when called upon, thereby providing a protective role. In the past, these cells were collected from the blood during steady-state marrow function to serve as both autologous and allogeneic graft products for transplantation. While this application has since been abandoned in favour of mobilized blood stem-cell transplantation, laboratory investigation of non-mobilized circulating stem cells will be needed if a full understanding of their purpose and function is to be learned.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-26
Number of pages8
JournalBailliere's Best Practice in Clinical Haematology
Volume12
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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Stem cells
Blood
Bone Marrow
Transplantation (surgical)
Stem Cell Transplantation
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Grafts
Blood Cells
Bone
Stem Cells
Transplantation
Transplants
Peripheral Blood Stem Cells

Keywords

  • Non-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Collection of autologous peripheral blood stem cells in steady state. / Kessinger, Margaret Anne.

In: Bailliere's Best Practice in Clinical Haematology, Vol. 12, No. 1-2, 01.01.1999, p. 19-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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