Cold temperature increases winter fruit removal rate of a bird-dispersed shrub

Charles Kwit, Douglas J. Levey, Cathryn H. Greenberg, Scott F. Pearson, John P McCarty, Sarah Sargent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We tested the hypothesis that winter removal rates of fruits of wax myrtle, Myrica cerifera, are higher in colder winters. Over a 9-year period, we monitored M. cerifera fruit crops in 13 0.1-ha study plots in South Carolina, U.S.A. Peak ripeness occurred in November, whereas peak removal occurred in the coldest months, December and January. Mean time to fruit removal within study plots was positively correlated with mean winter temperatures, thereby supporting our hypothesis. This result, combined with the generally low availability of winter arthropods, suggests that fruit abundance may play a role in determining winter survivorship and distribution of permanent resident and short-distance migrant birds. From the plant's perspective, it demonstrates inter-annual variation in the temporal component of seed dispersal, with possible consequences for post-dispersal seed and seedling ecology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-34
Number of pages5
JournalOecologia
Volume139
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2004

Fingerprint

Morella cerifera
shrub
shrubs
fruit
bird
fruits
winter
birds
seed dispersal
temperature
fruit crops
wax
survivorship
arthropod
annual variation
temporal variation
arthropods
survival rate
removal
rate

Keywords

  • Avian seed dispersal
  • Frugivory
  • Seed predation
  • Winter food
  • Yellow-rumped warbler

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Kwit, C., Levey, D. J., Greenberg, C. H., Pearson, S. F., McCarty, J. P., & Sargent, S. (2004). Cold temperature increases winter fruit removal rate of a bird-dispersed shrub. Oecologia, 139(1), 30-34. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-003-1470-6

Cold temperature increases winter fruit removal rate of a bird-dispersed shrub. / Kwit, Charles; Levey, Douglas J.; Greenberg, Cathryn H.; Pearson, Scott F.; McCarty, John P; Sargent, Sarah.

In: Oecologia, Vol. 139, No. 1, 01.03.2004, p. 30-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kwit, C, Levey, DJ, Greenberg, CH, Pearson, SF, McCarty, JP & Sargent, S 2004, 'Cold temperature increases winter fruit removal rate of a bird-dispersed shrub', Oecologia, vol. 139, no. 1, pp. 30-34. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-003-1470-6
Kwit, Charles ; Levey, Douglas J. ; Greenberg, Cathryn H. ; Pearson, Scott F. ; McCarty, John P ; Sargent, Sarah. / Cold temperature increases winter fruit removal rate of a bird-dispersed shrub. In: Oecologia. 2004 ; Vol. 139, No. 1. pp. 30-34.
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