Cognitive Phenotypes and the Evolution of Animal Decisions

Tamra C. Mendelson, Courtney L. Fitzpatrick, Mark E. Hauber, Charles H. Pence, Rafael L. Rodríguez, Rebecca J. Safran, Caitlin A. Stern, Jeffrey R. Stevens

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the clear fitness consequences of animal decisions, the science of animal decision making in evolutionary biology is underdeveloped compared with decision science in human psychology. Specifically, the field lacks a conceptual framework that defines and describes the relevant components of a decision, leading to imprecise language and concepts. The ‘judgment and decision-making’ (JDM) framework in human psychology is a powerful tool for framing and understanding human decisions, and we apply it here to components of animal decisions, which we refer to as ‘cognitive phenotypes’. We distinguish multiple cognitive phenotypes in the context of a JDM framework and highlight empirical approaches to characterize them as evolvable traits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)850-859
Number of pages10
JournalTrends in Ecology and Evolution
Volume31
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

phenotype
decision making
psychology
animal
animals
animal science
evolutionary biology
Biological Sciences
conceptual framework
fitness
decision
science

Keywords

  • choice
  • cognitive phenotype
  • discrimination
  • judgment and decision making
  • preference
  • recognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Mendelson, T. C., Fitzpatrick, C. L., Hauber, M. E., Pence, C. H., Rodríguez, R. L., Safran, R. J., ... Stevens, J. R. (2016). Cognitive Phenotypes and the Evolution of Animal Decisions. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 31(11), 850-859. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2016.08.008

Cognitive Phenotypes and the Evolution of Animal Decisions. / Mendelson, Tamra C.; Fitzpatrick, Courtney L.; Hauber, Mark E.; Pence, Charles H.; Rodríguez, Rafael L.; Safran, Rebecca J.; Stern, Caitlin A.; Stevens, Jeffrey R.

In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 31, No. 11, 01.11.2016, p. 850-859.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Mendelson, TC, Fitzpatrick, CL, Hauber, ME, Pence, CH, Rodríguez, RL, Safran, RJ, Stern, CA & Stevens, JR 2016, 'Cognitive Phenotypes and the Evolution of Animal Decisions', Trends in Ecology and Evolution, vol. 31, no. 11, pp. 850-859. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2016.08.008
Mendelson TC, Fitzpatrick CL, Hauber ME, Pence CH, Rodríguez RL, Safran RJ et al. Cognitive Phenotypes and the Evolution of Animal Decisions. Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 2016 Nov 1;31(11):850-859. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2016.08.008
Mendelson, Tamra C. ; Fitzpatrick, Courtney L. ; Hauber, Mark E. ; Pence, Charles H. ; Rodríguez, Rafael L. ; Safran, Rebecca J. ; Stern, Caitlin A. ; Stevens, Jeffrey R. / Cognitive Phenotypes and the Evolution of Animal Decisions. In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 11. pp. 850-859.
@article{0810a868cb904799ba8f9c91573a3c67,
title = "Cognitive Phenotypes and the Evolution of Animal Decisions",
abstract = "Despite the clear fitness consequences of animal decisions, the science of animal decision making in evolutionary biology is underdeveloped compared with decision science in human psychology. Specifically, the field lacks a conceptual framework that defines and describes the relevant components of a decision, leading to imprecise language and concepts. The ‘judgment and decision-making’ (JDM) framework in human psychology is a powerful tool for framing and understanding human decisions, and we apply it here to components of animal decisions, which we refer to as ‘cognitive phenotypes’. We distinguish multiple cognitive phenotypes in the context of a JDM framework and highlight empirical approaches to characterize them as evolvable traits.",
keywords = "choice, cognitive phenotype, discrimination, judgment and decision making, preference, recognition",
author = "Mendelson, {Tamra C.} and Fitzpatrick, {Courtney L.} and Hauber, {Mark E.} and Pence, {Charles H.} and Rodr{\'i}guez, {Rafael L.} and Safran, {Rebecca J.} and Stern, {Caitlin A.} and Stevens, {Jeffrey R.}",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.tree.2016.08.008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "850--859",
journal = "Trends in Ecology and Evolution",
issn = "0169-5347",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cognitive Phenotypes and the Evolution of Animal Decisions

AU - Mendelson, Tamra C.

AU - Fitzpatrick, Courtney L.

AU - Hauber, Mark E.

AU - Pence, Charles H.

AU - Rodríguez, Rafael L.

AU - Safran, Rebecca J.

AU - Stern, Caitlin A.

AU - Stevens, Jeffrey R.

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - Despite the clear fitness consequences of animal decisions, the science of animal decision making in evolutionary biology is underdeveloped compared with decision science in human psychology. Specifically, the field lacks a conceptual framework that defines and describes the relevant components of a decision, leading to imprecise language and concepts. The ‘judgment and decision-making’ (JDM) framework in human psychology is a powerful tool for framing and understanding human decisions, and we apply it here to components of animal decisions, which we refer to as ‘cognitive phenotypes’. We distinguish multiple cognitive phenotypes in the context of a JDM framework and highlight empirical approaches to characterize them as evolvable traits.

AB - Despite the clear fitness consequences of animal decisions, the science of animal decision making in evolutionary biology is underdeveloped compared with decision science in human psychology. Specifically, the field lacks a conceptual framework that defines and describes the relevant components of a decision, leading to imprecise language and concepts. The ‘judgment and decision-making’ (JDM) framework in human psychology is a powerful tool for framing and understanding human decisions, and we apply it here to components of animal decisions, which we refer to as ‘cognitive phenotypes’. We distinguish multiple cognitive phenotypes in the context of a JDM framework and highlight empirical approaches to characterize them as evolvable traits.

KW - choice

KW - cognitive phenotype

KW - discrimination

KW - judgment and decision making

KW - preference

KW - recognition

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84992315931&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84992315931&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.tree.2016.08.008

DO - 10.1016/j.tree.2016.08.008

M3 - Review article

C2 - 27693087

AN - SCOPUS:84992315931

VL - 31

SP - 850

EP - 859

JO - Trends in Ecology and Evolution

JF - Trends in Ecology and Evolution

SN - 0169-5347

IS - 11

ER -