Cognitive function and mood in MDMA/THC users, THC users and non-drug using controls

C. T.J. Lamers, A. Bechara, M. Rizzo, J. G. Ramaekers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Repeated ecstasy (MDMA) use is reported to impair cognition and cause increased feelings of depression and anxiety. Yet, many relevant studies have failed to control for use of drugs other than MDMA, especially marijuana (THC). To address these confounding effects we compared behavioural performance of 11 MDMA/THC users, 15 THC users and 15 non-drug users matched for age and intellect. We tested the hypothesis that reported feelings of depression and anxiety and cognitive impairment (memory, executive function and decision making) are more severe in MDMA/THC users than in THC users. MDMA/THC users reported more intense feelings of depression and anxiety than THC users and non-drug users. Memory function was impaired in both groups of drug users. MDMA/THC users showed slower psychomotor speed and less mental flexibility than non-drug users. THC users exhibited less mental flexibility and performed worse on the decision making task compared to non-drug users but these functions were similar to those in MDMA/THC users. It was concluded that MDMA use is associated with increased feelings of depression and anxiety compared to THC users and non-drug users. THC users were impaired in some cognitive abilities to the same degree as MDMA/THC users, suggesting that some cognitive impairment attributed to MDMA is more likely due to concurrent THC use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)302-311
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Psychopharmacology
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

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N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine
Dronabinol
Drug Users
Cognition
Emotions
Anxiety
Depression
Decision Making
Aptitude
Drug and Narcotic Control
Executive Function
Cannabis

Keywords

  • Decision making
  • Ecstasy
  • Executive functions
  • MDMA
  • Marijuana
  • Memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Cognitive function and mood in MDMA/THC users, THC users and non-drug using controls. / Lamers, C. T.J.; Bechara, A.; Rizzo, M.; Ramaekers, J. G.

In: Journal of Psychopharmacology, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.03.2006, p. 302-311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lamers, C. T.J. ; Bechara, A. ; Rizzo, M. ; Ramaekers, J. G. / Cognitive function and mood in MDMA/THC users, THC users and non-drug using controls. In: Journal of Psychopharmacology. 2006 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 302-311.
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