Co-Occurring Symptoms Contribute to Persistent Fatigue in Prostate Cancer

Li Rebekah Feng, Timothy Fuss, Kristin Dickinson, Alexander Ross, Leorey N. Saligan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Cancer-related fatigue is one of the most debilitating side effects of cancer and cancer therapy. We aimed to investigate co-occurring symptoms associated with persistent fatigue in men receiving external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods: A sample of 47 men with prostate cancer scheduled to receive radiotherapy (RT) were followed at baseline and 1 year after RT. Clinical and demographic data were obtained from chart review. Symptom measurements included urinary dysfunction (American Urological Association symptoms score), fatigue (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Fatigue questionnaire), sleep disturbance (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System - Sleep Disturbance form), pain (physical well-being domain pain item of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - General), and depressive symptoms (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale). Paired t tests, correlations, general linear models, and logistic regressions were used to determine associations between fatigue and other symptom scores. Results: At 1 year after RT, 34% of subjects continued to experience fatigue. Urinary dysfunction was the best clinical predictor of persistent fatigue. Pain and depressive symptoms further improved the predictive power of the model. A multivariate linear regression model containing all these three clinical variables (urinary dysfunction, pain, and depressive symptoms) explained 74% of total variance associated with persistent fatigue after RT. Conclusions: Persistent fatigue at 1 year after EBRT in prostate cancer survivors is likely related to a cluster of symptoms elicited by chronic inflammation. Therapies that target each of these symptoms will likely reduce fatigue in this patient population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-191
Number of pages9
JournalOncology (Switzerland)
Volume96
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Fatigue
Prostatic Neoplasms
Radiotherapy
Linear Models
Depression
Pain
Neoplasms
Sleep
Therapeutics
Information Systems
Survivors
Logistic Models
Demography
Inflammation
Population

Keywords

  • Cancer-related fatigue
  • Nocturia
  • Prostate cancer
  • Radiation therapy
  • Sleep disturbance
  • Urinary dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Co-Occurring Symptoms Contribute to Persistent Fatigue in Prostate Cancer. / Feng, Li Rebekah; Fuss, Timothy; Dickinson, Kristin; Ross, Alexander; Saligan, Leorey N.

In: Oncology (Switzerland), Vol. 96, No. 4, 01.04.2019, p. 183-191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feng, Li Rebekah ; Fuss, Timothy ; Dickinson, Kristin ; Ross, Alexander ; Saligan, Leorey N. / Co-Occurring Symptoms Contribute to Persistent Fatigue in Prostate Cancer. In: Oncology (Switzerland). 2019 ; Vol. 96, No. 4. pp. 183-191.
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