Cloning of the Arabidopsis and rice formaldehyde dehydrogenase genes

Implications for the origin of plant ADH enzymes

Rudy Dolferus, John Osterman, W. J. Peacock, E. S. Dennis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reports the cloning of the genes encoding the Arabidopsis and rice class III ADH enzymes, members of the alcohol dehydrogenase or medium chain reductase/dehydrogenase superfamily of proteins with glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (GSH-FDH). Both genes contain eight introns in exactly the same positions, and these positions are conserved in plant ethanol-active Adh genes (class P). These data provide further evidence that plant class P genes have evolved from class III genes by gene duplication and acquisition of new substrate specificities. The position of introns and similarities in the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of the different classes of ADH enzymes in plants and humans suggest that plant and animal class III enzymes diverged before they duplicated to give rise to plant and animal ethanol-active ADH enzymes. Plant class P ADH enzymes have gained substrate specificities and evolved promoters with different expression properties, in keeping with their metabolic function as part of the alcohol fermentation pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1131-1141
Number of pages11
JournalGenetics
Volume146
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 23 1997

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glutathione-independent formaldehyde dehydrogenase
Arabidopsis
Organism Cloning
Enzymes
Genes
Substrate Specificity
Introns
Oxidoreductases
Ethanol
Gene Duplication
Alcohol Dehydrogenase
Nucleic Acids
Fermentation
Glutathione
Oryza
Amino Acid Sequence
Alcohols

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Cite this

Cloning of the Arabidopsis and rice formaldehyde dehydrogenase genes : Implications for the origin of plant ADH enzymes. / Dolferus, Rudy; Osterman, John; Peacock, W. J.; Dennis, E. S.

In: Genetics, Vol. 146, No. 3, 23.07.1997, p. 1131-1141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dolferus, Rudy ; Osterman, John ; Peacock, W. J. ; Dennis, E. S. / Cloning of the Arabidopsis and rice formaldehyde dehydrogenase genes : Implications for the origin of plant ADH enzymes. In: Genetics. 1997 ; Vol. 146, No. 3. pp. 1131-1141.
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