Clinicians' training and confidence associated with treating school-age children who stutter: A national survey

Deborah J. Brisk, E. Charles Healey, Karen A. Hux

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this survey was to obtain updated information on school-based speech-language pathologists' training, confidence, attitudes, and perceptions associated with treating school-age children who stutter. A second goal was to investigate the impact of impending specialization training in fluency on service delivery to children who stutter. A total of 278 out of 500 (56%) randomly selected school clinicians certified by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) responded to the survey. The results showed a general improvement over previous reports in clinicians' training, confidence, and attitudes concerning providing assessment and intervention services to school-age children who stutter. However, clinicians who received their degrees in the mid-to-late 1970s were less positive regarding their preparation to evaluate and treat pre-school children who stutter than those clinicians who received their degrees within the last 10 years. The results also showed that respondents have fewer successes with adolescents who stutter than with any other student age group. Although a large majority of respondents would consult and request assistance from a "fluency specialist" if one were available, only 40% reported that specialists in fluency were needed in the schools. The results suggest that university training programs need to continue offering clinical experiences with school-age children who stutter and courses devoted exclusively to fluency disorders in order to develop clinicians who feel confident evaluating and treating fluency disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-172
Number of pages9
JournalLanguage, speech, and hearing services in schools
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1997

Fingerprint

confidence
school
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Language Therapy
language
preschool child
specialization
Surveys and Questionnaires
Children Who Stutter
School-age children
Clinicians
Confidence
training program
age group
assistance
adolescent
Age Groups
Students
university
Education

Keywords

  • Children who stutter
  • Clinician training
  • Fluency disorders
  • Fluency specialists
  • School-based services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Clinicians' training and confidence associated with treating school-age children who stutter : A national survey. / Brisk, Deborah J.; Healey, E. Charles; Hux, Karen A.

In: Language, speech, and hearing services in schools, Vol. 28, No. 2, 04.1997, p. 164-172.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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