Clinical significance of health status assessment measures in head and neck cancer: What do quality-of-life scores mean?

Gerry F. Funk, Lucy H. Karnell, Russell B. Smith, Alan J. Christensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the magnitude of clinically significant differences in domain scores for a quality-of-life questionnaire specific to head and neck cancer; and to demonstrate a clinically relevant method of presenting head and neck cancer-specific quality-of-life data using cutoff scores and clinical anchors. Design: Anchor-based and distribution-based techniques for determining clinically significant differences in health-related quality-of-life scores were used. Setting: University-based tertiary care hospital. Patients: A total of 421 patients with head and neck cancer enrolled in a longitudinal outcomes project. Main Outcome Measures: The Head and Neck Cancer Inventory; clinical anchor health status in the domains of speech, eating, and social disruption; and distribution-based clinically significant score differences. Results: Clinical anchor health states representing incremental levels of dysfunction were significantly correlated with domain scores for eating, speech, and social disruption. The anchor-based clinically important difference magnitudes were consistent with the values obtained using distribution-based techniques. For mean domain scores (minimum, 0; maximum, 100), differences of approximately 4, 10, and 14 or greater represented small, intermediate, and large clinically significant differences, respectively. Stratifying mean domain scores into low (0-30), intermediate (31-69), and high (70-100) categories allowed presentation of the health-related quality-of-life data in a clinically relevant format. Conclusions: This study provides benchmarks for small, intermediate, and large clinically significant changes in scores and demonstrates the presentation of health-related quality-of-life data in a clinically useful format.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)825-829
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume130
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2004

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Head and Neck Neoplasms
Health Status
Quality of Life
Eating
Benchmarking
Tertiary Healthcare
Tertiary Care Centers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Equipment and Supplies
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Clinical significance of health status assessment measures in head and neck cancer : What do quality-of-life scores mean? / Funk, Gerry F.; Karnell, Lucy H.; Smith, Russell B.; Christensen, Alan J.

In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 130, No. 7, 01.07.2004, p. 825-829.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Funk, Gerry F. ; Karnell, Lucy H. ; Smith, Russell B. ; Christensen, Alan J. / Clinical significance of health status assessment measures in head and neck cancer : What do quality-of-life scores mean?. In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. 2004 ; Vol. 130, No. 7. pp. 825-829.
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