Clinical evaluation of a dried blood spot assay for atazanavir

Trevor C VanSchooneveld, Susan Swindells, Sarah R. Nelson, Brian L. Robbins, Ryan Moore, Courtney V Fletcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current procedures for obtaining and measuring plasma concentrations of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) are technically challenging. Dried blood spot (DBS) assays offer a way to overcome many of the obstacles. We sought to develop a DBS assay for quantitation of the PI atazanavir (ATV) and to compare this method with a previously validated plasma assay. We prospectively enrolled 48 patients with well-controlled HIV disease who had been on ATV for at least 7 days. ATV was quantified from plasma by use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A reversed-phase ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) assay was utilized for DBS samples. The concentrations of ATV quantified in a DBS matrix showed very strong agreement with those measured in plasma (r 2 = 0.988). The mean difference in ATV concentration between the two methods was -10.8% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], -7.65% to -13.95%), indicating that the DBS method has a slight negative bias. A majority (97.8%) of the differences in concentration between the two assays fell within ±2 standard deviations. ATV concentrations were lower in subjects who had detectable HIV RNA in plasma (mean, 543 ng/ml) than in those with HIV RNA of <50 copies/ml (mean, 1,582 ng/ml) (P = 0.03, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that ATV quantitation in a DBS matrix is feasible and accurate. DBS use offers a convenient alternative for measuring plasma concentrations of ATV and may have utility in monitoring of drug concentrations in clinical practice and in future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4124-4128
Number of pages5
JournalAntimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Volume54
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010

Fingerprint

HIV
Nonparametric Statistics
Dried Blood Spot Testing
RNA
HIV Protease Inhibitors
Atazanavir Sulfate
Drug Monitoring
Protease Inhibitors
Liquid Chromatography
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Clinical evaluation of a dried blood spot assay for atazanavir. / VanSchooneveld, Trevor C; Swindells, Susan; Nelson, Sarah R.; Robbins, Brian L.; Moore, Ryan; Fletcher, Courtney V.

In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Vol. 54, No. 10, 01.10.2010, p. 4124-4128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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