Citizen Participation in Decision Making

Is It Worth the effort?

Renée A. Irvin, John S Stansbury

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

669 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is widely argued that increased community participation in government decision making produces many important benefits. Dissent is rare: It is difficult to envision anything but positive outcomes from citizens joining the policy process, collaborating with others and reaching consensus to bring about positive social and environmental change. This article, motivated by contextual problems encountered in a participatory watershed management initiative, reviews the citizen-participation literature and analyzes key considerations in determining whether community participation is an effective policy-making tool. We list conditions under which community participation may be costly and ineffective and when it can thrive and produce the greatest gains in effective citizen governance. From the detritus of an unsuccessful citizen-participation effort, we arrive at a more informed approach to guide policy makers in choosing a decision-making process that is appropriate for a community's particular needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-65
Number of pages11
JournalPublic Administration Review
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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citizens' participation
decision making
community
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decision-making process
governance
Decision making
Citizen participation
Community participation
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Marketing

Cite this

Citizen Participation in Decision Making : Is It Worth the effort? / Irvin, Renée A.; Stansbury, John S.

In: Public Administration Review, Vol. 64, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 55-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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