Cidofovir in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients: University of Nebraska experience

Diana F Florescu, Heather E. Chambers, Fang Qiu, Megan A. Keck, David F Mercer, Michael C. Morris, Marius C Florescu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Clinical experience with cidofovir in pediatric solid organ transplantation is limited. We assessed the effect of cidofovir use on renal function in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients. Methods: Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to determine if changes in renal function were significant, Wilcoxon rank-sum tests to test the association between changes in glomerular filtration rate and potential confounding factors, and MacNemar tests to compare the proportions of patients at different time points. Results: We included 25 patients with a mean age of 4.2 years (SD 4.6). More patients were receiving renal replacement therapy while being treated with cidofovir compared with baseline (24% vs. 4%; P = 0.03). For patients not receiving renal replacement therapy, there was no evidence of a significant median change in glomerular filtration rate from baseline to 1 month after cidofovir treatment (P = 0.32) or to the end of cidofovir treatment (P = 0.23) or in creatinine from baseline to the end of cidofovir therapy (P = 0.2). There was a marginal decreased median change in creatinine from baseline to 1 month after cidofovir treatment (P = 0.06). Fewer patients had proteinuria (72.2% vs. 27.8%; P = 0.02) and hematuria (22.2% vs. 0%) after cidofovir treatment. Conclusion: In our pediatric transplant cohort, cidofovir did not significantly change renal function reflected by creatinine, glomerular filtration rate, hematuria or proteinuria, but a significant number of patients required renal replacement therapy because of fluid overload.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-51
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Pediatrics
Transplants
Renal Replacement Therapy
Nonparametric Statistics
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Creatinine
Hematuria
Kidney
Proteinuria
Therapeutics
cidofovir
Transplant Recipients
Organ Transplantation

Keywords

  • Cidofovir
  • Creatinine
  • GFR
  • Hematuria
  • Proteinuria
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Cidofovir in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients : University of Nebraska experience. / Florescu, Diana F; Chambers, Heather E.; Qiu, Fang; Keck, Megan A.; Mercer, David F; Morris, Michael C.; Florescu, Marius C.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 47-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Clinical experience with cidofovir in pediatric solid organ transplantation is limited. We assessed the effect of cidofovir use on renal function in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients. Methods: Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to determine if changes in renal function were significant, Wilcoxon rank-sum tests to test the association between changes in glomerular filtration rate and potential confounding factors, and MacNemar tests to compare the proportions of patients at different time points. Results: We included 25 patients with a mean age of 4.2 years (SD 4.6). More patients were receiving renal replacement therapy while being treated with cidofovir compared with baseline (24{\%} vs. 4{\%}; P = 0.03). For patients not receiving renal replacement therapy, there was no evidence of a significant median change in glomerular filtration rate from baseline to 1 month after cidofovir treatment (P = 0.32) or to the end of cidofovir treatment (P = 0.23) or in creatinine from baseline to the end of cidofovir therapy (P = 0.2). There was a marginal decreased median change in creatinine from baseline to 1 month after cidofovir treatment (P = 0.06). Fewer patients had proteinuria (72.2{\%} vs. 27.8{\%}; P = 0.02) and hematuria (22.2{\%} vs. 0{\%}) after cidofovir treatment. Conclusion: In our pediatric transplant cohort, cidofovir did not significantly change renal function reflected by creatinine, glomerular filtration rate, hematuria or proteinuria, but a significant number of patients required renal replacement therapy because of fluid overload.",
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