3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Recently, an association has been proposed between cholecystectomy and various liver diseases. Our aim was to determine whether cholecystectomy in short bowel patients influences the risk of liver disease. Methods: We reviewed 422 adults: 182 underwent cholecystectomy prior to short bowel, 102 after developing short bowel, and 138 patients still had the gallbladder in place. Results: Compared to pre and post short bowel, gallbladder patients were significantly less likely to have obesity (18 % and 21 % vs 9 %), central line infections (59 % and 69 % vs 46 %), intestine <60 cm (30 % and 39 % vs 26 %), and require parenteral nutrition >1 year (72 % and 77 % vs 64 %). The incidence of fatty liver was similar (31, 26, and 25 %). Fibrosis/cirrhosis was less common in the gallbladder group (26 % and 36 % vs 16 %). Frequency of end-stage liver disease was similar (15, 22, and 11 %). On multivariate analysis, cholecystectomy, parenteral nutrition >1 year, line infection, and intestine <60 cm were predictors of fibrosis/cirrhosis. Parenteral nutrition >1 year, line infection, and intestine <60 cm were predictors of end-stage liver disease. Conclusions: Cholecystectomy does not appear to increase the incidence of liver disease in short bowel patients overall. Fibrosis/cirrhosis occurs significantly less frequently in patients with an intact gallbladder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-327
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Short Bowel Syndrome
Cholecystectomy
Liver Diseases
Gallbladder
Fibrosis
Intestines
End Stage Liver Disease
Infection
Incidence
Parenteral Nutrition
Fatty Liver
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity

Keywords

  • Liver disease
  • Short bowel syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Cholecystectomy and Liver Disease in Short Bowel Syndrome. / Thompson, Jon S; Weseman, Rebecca A.; Rochling, Fedja A; Lyden, Elizabeth; Grant, Wendy J.; Vargas, Luciano M; Langnas, Alan Norman; Mercer, David F.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 322-327.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Recently, an association has been proposed between cholecystectomy and various liver diseases. Our aim was to determine whether cholecystectomy in short bowel patients influences the risk of liver disease. Methods: We reviewed 422 adults: 182 underwent cholecystectomy prior to short bowel, 102 after developing short bowel, and 138 patients still had the gallbladder in place. Results: Compared to pre and post short bowel, gallbladder patients were significantly less likely to have obesity (18 {\%} and 21 {\%} vs 9 {\%}), central line infections (59 {\%} and 69 {\%} vs 46 {\%}), intestine <60 cm (30 {\%} and 39 {\%} vs 26 {\%}), and require parenteral nutrition >1 year (72 {\%} and 77 {\%} vs 64 {\%}). The incidence of fatty liver was similar (31, 26, and 25 {\%}). Fibrosis/cirrhosis was less common in the gallbladder group (26 {\%} and 36 {\%} vs 16 {\%}). Frequency of end-stage liver disease was similar (15, 22, and 11 {\%}). On multivariate analysis, cholecystectomy, parenteral nutrition >1 year, line infection, and intestine <60 cm were predictors of fibrosis/cirrhosis. Parenteral nutrition >1 year, line infection, and intestine <60 cm were predictors of end-stage liver disease. Conclusions: Cholecystectomy does not appear to increase the incidence of liver disease in short bowel patients overall. Fibrosis/cirrhosis occurs significantly less frequently in patients with an intact gallbladder.",
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author = "Thompson, {Jon S} and Weseman, {Rebecca A.} and Rochling, {Fedja A} and Elizabeth Lyden and Grant, {Wendy J.} and Vargas, {Luciano M} and Langnas, {Alan Norman} and Mercer, {David F}",
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T1 - Cholecystectomy and Liver Disease in Short Bowel Syndrome

AU - Thompson, Jon S

AU - Weseman, Rebecca A.

AU - Rochling, Fedja A

AU - Lyden, Elizabeth

AU - Grant, Wendy J.

AU - Vargas, Luciano M

AU - Langnas, Alan Norman

AU - Mercer, David F

PY - 2016/2/1

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N2 - Background: Recently, an association has been proposed between cholecystectomy and various liver diseases. Our aim was to determine whether cholecystectomy in short bowel patients influences the risk of liver disease. Methods: We reviewed 422 adults: 182 underwent cholecystectomy prior to short bowel, 102 after developing short bowel, and 138 patients still had the gallbladder in place. Results: Compared to pre and post short bowel, gallbladder patients were significantly less likely to have obesity (18 % and 21 % vs 9 %), central line infections (59 % and 69 % vs 46 %), intestine <60 cm (30 % and 39 % vs 26 %), and require parenteral nutrition >1 year (72 % and 77 % vs 64 %). The incidence of fatty liver was similar (31, 26, and 25 %). Fibrosis/cirrhosis was less common in the gallbladder group (26 % and 36 % vs 16 %). Frequency of end-stage liver disease was similar (15, 22, and 11 %). On multivariate analysis, cholecystectomy, parenteral nutrition >1 year, line infection, and intestine <60 cm were predictors of fibrosis/cirrhosis. Parenteral nutrition >1 year, line infection, and intestine <60 cm were predictors of end-stage liver disease. Conclusions: Cholecystectomy does not appear to increase the incidence of liver disease in short bowel patients overall. Fibrosis/cirrhosis occurs significantly less frequently in patients with an intact gallbladder.

AB - Background: Recently, an association has been proposed between cholecystectomy and various liver diseases. Our aim was to determine whether cholecystectomy in short bowel patients influences the risk of liver disease. Methods: We reviewed 422 adults: 182 underwent cholecystectomy prior to short bowel, 102 after developing short bowel, and 138 patients still had the gallbladder in place. Results: Compared to pre and post short bowel, gallbladder patients were significantly less likely to have obesity (18 % and 21 % vs 9 %), central line infections (59 % and 69 % vs 46 %), intestine <60 cm (30 % and 39 % vs 26 %), and require parenteral nutrition >1 year (72 % and 77 % vs 64 %). The incidence of fatty liver was similar (31, 26, and 25 %). Fibrosis/cirrhosis was less common in the gallbladder group (26 % and 36 % vs 16 %). Frequency of end-stage liver disease was similar (15, 22, and 11 %). On multivariate analysis, cholecystectomy, parenteral nutrition >1 year, line infection, and intestine <60 cm were predictors of fibrosis/cirrhosis. Parenteral nutrition >1 year, line infection, and intestine <60 cm were predictors of end-stage liver disease. Conclusions: Cholecystectomy does not appear to increase the incidence of liver disease in short bowel patients overall. Fibrosis/cirrhosis occurs significantly less frequently in patients with an intact gallbladder.

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