Children’s Agricultural Safety Network: Evaluating Organizational Effectiveness and Impacts

Mary E Cramer, Mary J. Wendl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Coalitions that are effectively organized and led are more likely to achieve their intended program outcomes and impacts, as well as achieve sustainability. External evaluation of the coalition’s governance and leadership can help identify strengths and areas for improvement. This article describes the evaluation of the Children’s Agricultural Safety Network (CASN)—a national coalition, or network of 45 organizational members. The conceptual framework, Internal Coalition Outcomes Hierarchy, guided the evaluation. We used a mixed-methods approach to answer study’s primary objectives from the perspective of CASN members and leaders for (a) organizational effectiveness, (b) network impact, and (c) member benefits. We collected quantitative data using a survey and the Internal Coalition Effectiveness (ICE) instrument. Focused interviews were conducted by phone to gather rich data on examples. Combined findings showed that both members and leaders rated the CASN effective in all construct areas that define successful coalitions. Members feel as invested in CASN success as do leaders. The major impact of CASN has been as a national leader and clearinghouse for childhood safety issues, and the most frequently cited example of impact was the national tractor safety campaign. Members identified the benefits of CASN membership as networking, resource sharing, and opportunities to enhance their knowledge, skills, and practices in the area. Members also valued the national attention that CASN was able to bring to the important issues in childhood agricultural safety. Suggestions for improvement were to focus on more research to improve best practices and strengthen dissemination and implementation science.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-115
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Agromedicine
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2015

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Keywords

  • Agriculture
  • children
  • coalitions
  • evaluation
  • safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Children’s Agricultural Safety Network : Evaluating Organizational Effectiveness and Impacts. / Cramer, Mary E; Wendl, Mary J.

In: Journal of Agromedicine, Vol. 20, No. 2, 03.04.2015, p. 105-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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