Characterizing inflammatory breast cancer among Arab Americans in the California, Detroit and New Jersey Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries (1988-2008)

Kelly A. Hirko, Amr S Soliman, Mousumi Banerjee, Julie Ruterbusch, Joe B. Harford, Robert M. Chamberlain, John J. Graff, Sofia D. Merajver, Kendra Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is characterized by an apparent geographical distribution in incidence, being more common in North Africa than other parts of the world. Despite the rapid growth of immigrants to the United States from Arab nations, little is known about disease patterns among Arab Americans because a racial category is rarely considered for this group. The aim of this study was to advance our understanding of the burden of IBC in Arab ethnic populations by describing the proportion of IBC among different racial groups, including Arab Americans from the Detroit, New Jersey and California Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries. Methods: We utilized a validated Arab surname algorithm to identify women of Arab descent from the SEER registries. Differences in the proportion of IBC out of all breast cancer and IBC characteristics by race and menopausal status were evaluated using chi-square tests for categorical variables, t-tests and ANOVA tests for continuous variables, and log-rank tests for survival data. We modeled the association between race and IBC among all women with breast cancer using hierarchical logistic regression models, adjusting for individual and census tract-level variables. Results: Statistically significant differences in the proportion of IBC out of all breast cancers by race were evident. In a hierarchical model, adjusting for age, estrogen and progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth receptor 2, registry and census-tract level education, Arab-Americans (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.2,1.9), Hispanics (OR=1.2, 95% CI=1.1,1.3), Non-Hispanic Blacks (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.2, 1.4), and American Indians/Alaskans (OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.1, 3.4) had increased odds of IBC, while Asians (OR=0.6, 95% CI=0.6, 0.7) had decreased odds of IBC as compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. Conclusions: IBC may be more common among certain minority groups, including Arab American women. Understanding the descriptive epidemiology of IBC by race may generate hypotheses about risk factors for this aggressive disease. Future research should focus on etiologic factors that may explain these differences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalSpringerPlus
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 29 2013

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Inflammatory Breast Neoplasms
Registries
Epidemiology
Censuses
Breast Neoplasms
Logistic Models
Northern Africa
Minority Groups
North American Indians
Progesterone Receptors
Chi-Square Distribution
Growth
Hispanic Americans
Estrogen Receptors
Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • Arab
  • Hierarchical logistic regression
  • Inflammatory breast cancer
  • Race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Characterizing inflammatory breast cancer among Arab Americans in the California, Detroit and New Jersey Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries (1988-2008). / Hirko, Kelly A.; Soliman, Amr S; Banerjee, Mousumi; Ruterbusch, Julie; Harford, Joe B.; Chamberlain, Robert M.; Graff, John J.; Merajver, Sofia D.; Schwartz, Kendra.

In: SpringerPlus, Vol. 2, No. 1, 29.04.2013, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirko, KA, Soliman, AS, Banerjee, M, Ruterbusch, J, Harford, JB, Chamberlain, RM, Graff, JJ, Merajver, SD & Schwartz, K 2013, 'Characterizing inflammatory breast cancer among Arab Americans in the California, Detroit and New Jersey Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries (1988-2008)', SpringerPlus, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1186/2193-1801-2-3
Hirko, Kelly A. ; Soliman, Amr S ; Banerjee, Mousumi ; Ruterbusch, Julie ; Harford, Joe B. ; Chamberlain, Robert M. ; Graff, John J. ; Merajver, Sofia D. ; Schwartz, Kendra. / Characterizing inflammatory breast cancer among Arab Americans in the California, Detroit and New Jersey Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries (1988-2008). In: SpringerPlus. 2013 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 1-8.
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abstract = "Introduction: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is characterized by an apparent geographical distribution in incidence, being more common in North Africa than other parts of the world. Despite the rapid growth of immigrants to the United States from Arab nations, little is known about disease patterns among Arab Americans because a racial category is rarely considered for this group. The aim of this study was to advance our understanding of the burden of IBC in Arab ethnic populations by describing the proportion of IBC among different racial groups, including Arab Americans from the Detroit, New Jersey and California Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries. Methods: We utilized a validated Arab surname algorithm to identify women of Arab descent from the SEER registries. Differences in the proportion of IBC out of all breast cancer and IBC characteristics by race and menopausal status were evaluated using chi-square tests for categorical variables, t-tests and ANOVA tests for continuous variables, and log-rank tests for survival data. We modeled the association between race and IBC among all women with breast cancer using hierarchical logistic regression models, adjusting for individual and census tract-level variables. Results: Statistically significant differences in the proportion of IBC out of all breast cancers by race were evident. In a hierarchical model, adjusting for age, estrogen and progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth receptor 2, registry and census-tract level education, Arab-Americans (OR=1.5, 95{\%} CI=1.2,1.9), Hispanics (OR=1.2, 95{\%} CI=1.1,1.3), Non-Hispanic Blacks (OR=1.3, 95{\%} CI=1.2, 1.4), and American Indians/Alaskans (OR=1.9, 95{\%} CI=1.1, 3.4) had increased odds of IBC, while Asians (OR=0.6, 95{\%} CI=0.6, 0.7) had decreased odds of IBC as compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. Conclusions: IBC may be more common among certain minority groups, including Arab American women. Understanding the descriptive epidemiology of IBC by race may generate hypotheses about risk factors for this aggressive disease. Future research should focus on etiologic factors that may explain these differences.",
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AU - Banerjee, Mousumi

AU - Ruterbusch, Julie

AU - Harford, Joe B.

AU - Chamberlain, Robert M.

AU - Graff, John J.

AU - Merajver, Sofia D.

AU - Schwartz, Kendra

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N2 - Introduction: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is characterized by an apparent geographical distribution in incidence, being more common in North Africa than other parts of the world. Despite the rapid growth of immigrants to the United States from Arab nations, little is known about disease patterns among Arab Americans because a racial category is rarely considered for this group. The aim of this study was to advance our understanding of the burden of IBC in Arab ethnic populations by describing the proportion of IBC among different racial groups, including Arab Americans from the Detroit, New Jersey and California Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries. Methods: We utilized a validated Arab surname algorithm to identify women of Arab descent from the SEER registries. Differences in the proportion of IBC out of all breast cancer and IBC characteristics by race and menopausal status were evaluated using chi-square tests for categorical variables, t-tests and ANOVA tests for continuous variables, and log-rank tests for survival data. We modeled the association between race and IBC among all women with breast cancer using hierarchical logistic regression models, adjusting for individual and census tract-level variables. Results: Statistically significant differences in the proportion of IBC out of all breast cancers by race were evident. In a hierarchical model, adjusting for age, estrogen and progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth receptor 2, registry and census-tract level education, Arab-Americans (OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.2,1.9), Hispanics (OR=1.2, 95% CI=1.1,1.3), Non-Hispanic Blacks (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.2, 1.4), and American Indians/Alaskans (OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.1, 3.4) had increased odds of IBC, while Asians (OR=0.6, 95% CI=0.6, 0.7) had decreased odds of IBC as compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. Conclusions: IBC may be more common among certain minority groups, including Arab American women. Understanding the descriptive epidemiology of IBC by race may generate hypotheses about risk factors for this aggressive disease. Future research should focus on etiologic factors that may explain these differences.

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