Characterization of Closed Head Impact Injury in Rat

Yi Hua, Praveen Akula, Matthew Kelso, Linxia Gu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The closed head impact (CHI) rat models are commonly used for studying the traumatic brain injury. The impact parameters vary considerably among different laboratories, making the comparison of research findings difficult. In this work, numerical CHI experiments were conducted to investigate the sensitivities of intracranial responses to various impact parameters (e.g., impact depth, velocity, and position; impactor diameter, material, and shape). A three-dimensional finite element rat head model with anatomical details was subjected to impact loadings. Results revealed that impact depth and impactor shape were the two leading factors affecting intracranial responses. The influence of impactor diameter was region-specific and an increase in impactor diameter could substantially increase tissue strains in the region which located directly beneath the impactor. The lateral impact could induce higher strains in the brain than the central impact. An indentation depth instead of impact depth would be appropriate to characterize the influence of a large deformed rubber impactor. The experimentally observed velocity-dependent injury severity could be attributed to the "overshoot" phenomenon. This work could be used to better design or compare CHI experiments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number272976
JournalBioMed research international
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Closed Head Injuries
Rats
Brain
Head
Rubber
Indentation
Experiments
Tissue
Anatomic Models
Wounds and Injuries
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Characterization of Closed Head Impact Injury in Rat. / Hua, Yi; Akula, Praveen; Kelso, Matthew; Gu, Linxia.

In: BioMed research international, Vol. 2015, 272976, 01.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hua, Yi ; Akula, Praveen ; Kelso, Matthew ; Gu, Linxia. / Characterization of Closed Head Impact Injury in Rat. In: BioMed research international. 2015 ; Vol. 2015.
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